cock a snook

cock a snook

To regard someone or something with disrespect. Primarily heard in UK. Don't you cock a snook at my instructions—I'm your superior!
See also: cock, snook

cock a snook at someone

to show or express defiance or scorn at someone. He cocked a snook at the traffic cop and tore up the ticket. The boy cocked a snook at the park attendant and walked on the grass.
See also: cock, snook

cock a snook

Thumb one's nose, as in As soon as the teacher turned her back, the boys cocked a snook at her. This expression was first recorded in 1791 and the precise source of snook, here used in the sense of "a derisive gesture," has been lost. It is more widely used in Britain but is not unknown in America.
See also: cock, snook

cock a snook

openly show contempt or a lack of respect for someone or something. informal, chiefly British
Literally, if you cock a snook, you place your hand so that your thumb touches your nose and your fingers are spread out, in order to express contempt. Recorded from the late 18th century, the expression's origins are uncertain—as are those of the gesture itself, which occurs under a variety of names and in many countries, the earliest definite mention of it being by Rabelais in 1532 .
See also: cock, snook

cock a ˈsnook at somebody/something

(British English, informal)
1 make a rude gesture by putting your thumb to your nose
2 do or say something that shows your lack of respect for somebody/something, especially when you cannot be punished for this: She cocked a snook at her teachers by going to school with her hair dyed purple.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kerry-Anne Richardson, who runs Cock A Snook Tattoo Parlour in Heaton, Newcastle, is raising thousands of pounds for charity Mind.
May Phil's pen continue to write on for many years, his old tractor harrow many more acres and Phil himself continue to cock a snook at politicians.
IThe Chancellor's decision to cock a snook at Scotland's bid to set its own levels of Air Passenger Duty is, of course, good for the North.
Youngsters now cock a snook at anyone who dares chastise them.
The next time you're at the airport, excited about jetting off on holiday, simply use this gizmo to weigh your cases quickly and accurately - in pounds or kilograms - and cock a snook at the over-zealous check-in staff (not literally, you still need to get on the flight).
Worse still, as if to cock a snook at the natural environment, the proponents have chosen a site that falls on part of the Denbigh Moors Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), a protected historic landscape where some of Britain's rarest birds nest and feed.
That's why the cock-a-hoop Aussies have been well-backed to cock a snook at Andrew Strauss's (right) boys in the Fourth Test.
DAR ReMi can cock a snook A in the face of history by w r in-ning the Coral-Eclipse Stakes at Sandown.
Just as the public were clamouring for Best Mate to undertake a more combative schedule, it seemed that the Moscow Flyer camp were doing their bit to cock a snook at such negative tactics by considering letting the horse take his chance against the best three-milers.
If it just happens to cock a snook at the legions of ambulance-chasing lawyers who perpetuate the compensation culture for their own benefit, well what can be wrong with that?
Those who cock a snook at our legal system must not only be dealt with, they must be seen to be dealt with, if it is to have any credibility.
I know it won't bring the trees back, but hopefully will cock a snook at the greedy developers who don't give a damn.
Instead of setting an example to the populace these so-called representatives of the masses cock a snook at those struggling to keep their heads above water.
I am doing it to cock a snook at the young, slim and dewy.
It is ridiculous that banks continue to cock a snook at the Government and public with regard to bonuses and final-deal settlements.