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after hours

after the regular closing time; after any normal or regular time, such as one's bedtime. John got a job sweeping floors in the library after hours.
See also: after, hour

Join the club!

Inf. an expression indicating that the person spoken to is in the same, or a similar, unfortunate state as the speaker. You don't have anyplace to stay? Join the club! Neither do we. Did you get fired too? Join the club!
See also: join

be in the club

  (British old-fashioned)
to be pregnant Is Tina in the club? She's looking quite large around the tummy.
See also: club

Join the club!

  (British, American & Australian) also Welcome to the club! (American & Australian)
something that you say to someone who has just told you about an experience or problem that they have had in order to show that you have had the same experience or problem too 'I can't stop eating chocolate.' 'Join the club!' 'We can't afford a vacation this year.' 'Welcome to the club!'
See also: join

be in the pudding club

  (British old-fashioned)
to be pregnant Tina says Karen's in the pudding club.
See over-egg the pudding
See also: club, pudding

after hours

After normal working hours, after closing time; also, after legal or established opening hours. For example, I haven't time while the shop is open, but I can see you after hours, or The restaurant employees sometimes stayed for a meal after hours. This term originally referred to laws governing business hours. It also gave rise to the term after-hours club, for a drinking club that remained open later than similar establishments. [Mid-1800s]
See also: after, hour

join the club

A phrase used to express sympathy for a common experience. For example, You waited three hours for the doctor? Join the club! [c. 1940]
See also: club, join

Welcome to the club

and Join the club and WTTC
sent. & comp. abb. The rest of us are in the same situation. So you’re short of cash? Welcome to the club. You’re just like us. Join the club; we’ve got jackets.
See also: club, welcome

Join the club

verb
See also: club, join
References in classic literature ?
Gossett was an unpopular subject with members of the Cape Pleasant Golf Club.
I leave the answer to my club," was the Buli's reply.
President and gentlemen," he began, assuming a parliamentary attitude and tone, "I wish to propose the admission of a new member--one who highly deserves the honor, would be deeply grateful for it, and would add immensely to the spirit of the club, the literary value of the paper, and be no end jolly and nice.
Ever she sits here and asks of the passers by that they should bring him to her, offering the great club for a reward; but they dare not
When he breakfasted or dined all the resources of the club--its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy--aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.
He carelessly lifted his club, and balanced it in his hand, measuring Antaeus with his eye, from head to foot, not as if wonder-smitten at his stature, but as if he had seen a great many Giants before, and this was by no means the biggest of them.
How this miracle of fire and ice was to be created, and to sustain itself in a harsh world, he had never taken the time to think out; but he was content to hold his view without analysing it, since he knew it was that of all the carefully-brushed, white-waistcoated, button- hole-flowered gentlemen who succeeded each other in the club box, exchanged friendly greetings with him, and turned their opera-glasses critically on the circle of ladies who were the product of the system.
At the beginning of March, old Count Ilya Rostov was very busy arranging a dinner in honor of Prince Bagration at the English Club.
I was pleased to find that William's troubles were near an end without my having to interfere in his behalf, and I then remembered that he would not be able to see the girl Irene from the library windows, which are at the back of the club.
One smash from the club was sufficient to convince him that the white god knew how to handle it, and he was too wise to fight the inevitable.
The younger members of the club, humouring the joke, sent a waiter for the 'Peerage'; and read aloud the memoir of the nobleman in question, for the Doctor's benefit-- with illustrative morsels of information interpolated by themselves.
When the Stranger with a Club was brought to trial, the complainant said to the Judge:
Given four, they name a keeper of records, and the office is ready for work; five, they convene a general meeting, and the club is fully constituted.
The principal members of the Gun Club, President Barbicane, Major Elphinstone, the secretary Joseph T.
If you meet a member of that select club, "The Twelve True Fishermen," entering the Vernon Hotel for the annual club dinner, you will observe, as he takes off his overcoat, that his evening coat is green and not black.