club

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Related to clubbed: clubbed fingers

be in the club

To be pregnant. Primarily heard in UK. Yes, it's true—I'm in the club and about three months along!
See also: club

be in the pudding club

To be pregnant. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Yes, it's true—I'm in the pudding club and about three months along!
See also: club, pudding

after hours

Beyond the established time that something typically closes or ends. I had to stay after hours in order to finish that report. My father is friends with the shop owner, so she opened it after hours just for me.
See also: after, hour

after hours

after the regular closing time; after any normal or regular time, such as one's bedtime. John got a job sweeping floors in the library after hours.
See also: after, hour

Join the club!

Inf. an expression indicating that the person spoken to is in the same, or a similar, unfortunate state as the speaker. You don't have anyplace to stay? Join the club! Neither do we. Did you get fired too? Join the club!
See also: join

be in the club

  (British old-fashioned)
to be pregnant Is Tina in the club? She's looking quite large around the tummy.
See also: club

Join the club!

  (British, American & Australian) also Welcome to the club! (American & Australian)
something that you say to someone who has just told you about an experience or problem that they have had in order to show that you have had the same experience or problem too 'I can't stop eating chocolate.' 'Join the club!' 'We can't afford a vacation this year.' 'Welcome to the club!'
See also: join

be in the pudding club

  (British old-fashioned)
to be pregnant Tina says Karen's in the pudding club.
See over-egg the pudding
See also: club, pudding

after hours

After normal working hours, after closing time; also, after legal or established opening hours. For example, I haven't time while the shop is open, but I can see you after hours, or The restaurant employees sometimes stayed for a meal after hours. This term originally referred to laws governing business hours. It also gave rise to the term after-hours club, for a drinking club that remained open later than similar establishments. [Mid-1800s]
See also: after, hour

join the club

A phrase used to express sympathy for a common experience. For example, You waited three hours for the doctor? Join the club! [c. 1940]
See also: club, join

Welcome to the club

and Join the club and WTTC
sent. & comp. abb. The rest of us are in the same situation. So you’re short of cash? Welcome to the club. You’re just like us. Join the club; we’ve got jackets.
See also: club, welcome

Join the club

verb
See also: club, join
References in classic literature ?
Aunt Olivia was most beautiful amid the frost of her bridal veil, and the Story Girl, in an unusually long white dress, with her brown curls clubbed up behind, looked so tall and grown- up that we hardly recognized her.
I knew that I rose high out of the water, and, with clubbed rifle, dealt the animal a terrific blow upon the skull, that I saw Victory, her long blade flashing in her hand, close, striking, upon the beast, that a great paw fell upon her shoulder, and that I was swept beneath the surface of the water like a straw before the prow of a freighter.
For instance, let us suppose that Homer and Virgil, Aristotle and Cicero, Thucydides and Livy, could have met all together, and have clubbed their several talents to have composed a treatise on the art of dancing: I believe it will be readily agreed they could not have equalled the excellent treatise which Mr Essex hath given us on that subject, entitled, The Rudiments of Genteel Education.
It is unfortunate we haven't plenty of ammunition, but I think, anyway, that they suffer less from being clubbed than from being all shot up.
The gallant young fellows treated the company round to champagne at the table d'hote, rode out with the women, or hired horses on country excursions, clubbed money to take boxes at the play or the opera, betted over the fair shoulders of the ladies at the ecarte tables, and wrote home to their parents in Devonshire about their felicitous introduction to foreign society.
A number of the immorally rich clubbed together and presented it to the nation; and two of the richly immoral intend to snaffle it for themselves.
How will you like to see your mother in a straitjacket an' a padded cell, shut out from the light of the sun an' beaten like a nigger before the war, Willie, beaten an' clubbed like a regular black nigger?