clown

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class clown

A mischievous or impudent student who frequently disrupts the class with jokes, pranks, or wry comments as a means of drawing attention to him- or herself. Every teacher has to deal with class clowns eventually.
See also: class, clown

clown around

slang To joke, play, or otherwise behave in a silly way. I can see you boys clowning around back there! Sit down and do the math problems I assigned. The kids are just clowning around with each other in the backyard, if you want to call them for dinner.
See also: around, clown

clown around (with someone)

Fig. to join with someone in acting silly; [for two or more people] to act silly together. The boys were clowning around with each other. The kids are having fun clowning around.
See also: around, clown

clown

n. a fool. Tell that clown in the front row to shut up.

clown around

in. to act silly; to mess around. We were just clowning around. We didn’t mean to break anything.
See also: around, clown
References in periodicals archive ?
An equal number of clownishly costumed performers work for rodeos, according to the Rodeo Clowns & Bullfighters Association.
In the second she is a clownishly dressed housewife in curlers holding a mop and stooping to pick up milk bottles.
In this gallows/gallery-humor vein, Dancing Pop-Up Fishing Sculpture, 2010--the clownishly abstract, patchwork, glued fabric object constituting the show's main event--riffs on both figurative and non-representational sculpture.
Fantastichini, the only one with a (weird) sense of humor, constructs a character so clownishly whimsical that all tragedy seems to bounce off him.
A sadly abused, unloved boy when first we meet him, Antoine grows into a morose, clownishly impulsive, wistfully aspiring and ever-dissatisfied pursuer of a series of women.
Harris is excellent as the philosopher emperor (played by Alec Guinness in 1964) who rues having spent most of his career making war, and supporting players Jacobi, Hounsou and a corpulent David Hemmings, as the clownishly bewigged emcee at the Colosseum, make distinctly favorable impressions.
In one of his conversations with legendary Berlin religious-studies scholar Klaus Heinrich (Theweleit's second source), Muller, who at times toward the end of his life presented himself clownishly in less-than-earnest interviews and discussions, clarified in a serious moment his often ambiguous concern with the German nation and German history, claiming he actually wished for a "burial of the nation": not monuments and gravestones, but disappearance.