close up

(redirected from close-ups)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

close up

1. verb Literally, to shut something that is open. Be sure to close up the oven after you take out the cookies.
2. verb To sew an opening shut at the end of a surgical procedure. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "close" and "up." The procedure is finished. Now we need to close him up.
3. verb To heal, as of a cut or wound. The cut isn't too deep, so it should close up on its own, no stitches needed.
4. verb To become completely closed or sealed shut. After I got hit in the face with a baseball, my eye swelled so much that it actually closed up.
5. verb To cease business operations for any length of time (often permanently). I loved that restaurant, so I'm very disappointed that it closed up permanently. That shop always closes up for two weeks in the summer to accommodate the owner's vacation.
6. verb To close something, typically a place, securely. I hope you closed up the store before you left for the night.
7. noun A shot in which the camera is positioned very close to the subject. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I want the next scene to start with a close-up of Caroline standing in the doorway. Her close-ups of flowers are just gorgeous—she's a very underrated photographer.
8. noun A detailed or intimate portrayal or exploration of something. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. This novel is a close-up of Depression-era America.
See also: close, up

close someone up

to close a surgical wound at the end of a surgical procedure. Fred, would you close her up for me? Fred closed up the patient.
See also: close, up

close something up

 
1. to close someone's business, office, shop, etc., temporarily or permanently. Tom's restaurant nearly went out of business when the health department closed him up. The health department closed up the restaurant.
2. to close something that is open, such as a door or a box. Please close the door when you leave.
See also: close, up

close up

 
1. Lit. [for an opening] to close completely. The door closed up and would not open again. The wound will close up completely in a day or so.
2. Fig. [for a place of business] to close for business. The store closed up and did not open until the next day.
See also: close, up

close up

Also, close up shop. Stop doing business, temporarily or permanently; also, stop working. For example, The bank is closing up all its overseas branches, or That's enough work for one day-I'm closing up shop and going home. [Late 1500s]
See also: close, up

close up

v.
1. To shut something completely: The doctor closed up the cut with stitches. I closed the box up with wire and tape.
2. To become shut completely: My eye closed up because of the infection.
3. To shut and lock a building for a period of time: It's my job to close up the store for the night because I'm always the last one to leave. At the end of August, we'll close the cottage up for the winter.
See also: close, up
References in periodicals archive ?
WHENEVER the TV news media have a report regarding the older generation they are always keen to show a close-up of a wrinkly hand on a walking stick .
Carl, 41, dreamed up The Close-Ups as an outlet for his musical ambitions after tiring of live performance.
The i700G has a 3,240,000-pixel CCD, so the photos these hardy boys will be able to take will be very decent, maxing out at 2,048 x 1,536 dots, and there's a 3x optical zoom for close-ups.
In a September 24 story about his campaign to eliminate "adult" movies from hotels across America, LISA Today reported: "Hotel room pay-per-view offerings have become more graphic in recent years, showing close-ups of all manner of sex acts, Burress says.
George's photo is among the most revealing of the close-ups of the Panthers and their supporters during that momentous year.
It became clear to writers, producers, and technicians that the close-up was very effective for the small screen, so close-ups and extreme close-ups became commonplace.
The theatre will have twelve digital cameras multiplexed to four independent video streams, which can be used to capture close-ups of the equipment being demonstrated and of the demonstrator and the audience as they interact.
Some of the pictures feature close-ups of the three drug barons who were blasted with a shotgun in a deserted country lane.
Optics from proven lens maker Carl Zeiss allow for precise focus and clearer, sharper images, even in extreme close-ups.
This new book consists of the following elements: some lectures and speeches by Libeskind, often to lay audiences, usually helpful and intelligent where comprehensible, but occasionally questionable and silly and often quite repetitive; some few architectural drawings too small to read properly; some photographs, largely close-ups of nastily-built models; and many pages of drivel, for which the following example will suffice: 'The Eve of the Chicken is a phrase that moves toward the distended axiom, in which motion stalls at its maximum ridicules the movement of the cosmos'.
An interesting mixture, then, of close-ups and panoramas, linked by the conviction that portrayal of the past cannot ignore the past's own perspectives.
SAN FRANCISCO -- GoFish Corporation, the leading publicly traded online video company where millions of people come to watch, upload and share videos, today announced a partnership with Hollywood Close-Ups, Inc.
Pat Brennan, Navan Too many close-ups Sorry, but the Channel 4 pictures were frequently far too close up to get the sense of the Gold Cup at key moments.
Taking super close-ups of ordinary objects, such as nails and toy cars, McGroarty Arts Center photography teacher John Free, left of center, wants his young students to learn that a great photograph can come from any source.
Flores" (Flowers; 2002), a series of gigantic close-ups of flowers and plants with evident sexual allusions, revels in baroque sensuality; bigger than life, they look exquisite in the gallery space.