clod

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clod

n. a stupid and oafish person. (Usually refers to a male. Widely known. Usually objectionable.) Don’t be such a clod! Put on your tie, and let’s go.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps her approach represents a lame attempt at masculinity, but are audiences really expected to believe this cloddish Orfeo capable of charming the forces of Hades into relinquishing a beauty like Euridice?
The artist's untroubled creative id was particularly vivid in the dozens of discrete objects that populated a wall of small shelves, delicately cloddish sculptures looking like something from the workroom of Franz West's little sister: tiny houses and containers and doll-like protuberances, all made from ad hoc combinations of craft-basket bits and bobs in taffy pinks, baby blues, and creamy yellows, sewn and glued and pinned together, then sugarcoated with glitter and lace.
Utterly predictable, cloddish comedy from Britain's answer to Jerry Lewis.
The cloddish camp rock Whatever shows they don't mind sounding as dated as an old Queen B-side, while I Did It For You shamelessly recreates Bryan Adams blustery multi-million selling Everything I Do.
We know what you're thinking and we thought the same thing at first -- holsters that trumpet themselves as "one-size-fits-all" are sure to be cloddish compromises.
Jeppesen's Fru Von Everdingen, the rich widow who falls for the cloddish brother in Kermesse, was beautiful and stuck-up, but also vulnerable.
Faure's lovely Cantique de Jean Racine was not helped by a plodding, cloddish bass-line from the accompaniment, a painfully uncomfortable imbalance with the singers.
He brings us up to the present with two well-known political sex cases: those of Bob Packwood, the former Oregon senator, who in 1994 was forced to turn over his diaries to the Senate Ethics Committee as a part of the sexual-misconduct investigation of his cloddish advances on female staffers and lobbyists; and Monica Lewinsky, the former White House intern, from whose home computer Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr (among his other excesses) was able to extract drafts of never-sent love letters to President Bill Clinton.
He bribes one of the cloddish guards to get the necessary materials to build a glider and he flies away during the celebration of the new queen's coronation.