cling together

cling together

1. Of two or more things, to adhere to one another. The pages in this book are so thin that they usually cling together.
2. Of two or more people, to hold each other tightly. The wind was so strong that we had to cling together just to cross the parking lot!
See also: cling, together

cling together

[for two or more people or animals] to hold on tightly to each other. The two children clung together throughout the ordeal. The baby baboon and its mother clung together and could not be separated.
See also: cling, together
References in classic literature ?
I have always longed to tell a simple and true story, which should strike terror into two young lovers, and drive them to take refuge each in the other's heart, as two children cling together at the sight of a snake by a woodside.
March, as she and her daughter went through the new kingdom arm in arm, for just then they seemed to cling together more tenderly than ever.
The design helped the bricks cling together better than any other plastic building blocks on the market.
Most associate fire ants with their sting but these insects are also notable for their ability to cling together and turn their community into one giant raft.
Madrassa students tend to cling together, which is only natural.
Its elements are made to cling together providing high early strength by combining the strength and durability of conventional concrete with the ease of construction.
The Birmingham Evening Mail reported on October 30, 1934: "They cling together in a compact community, held close by race, language and religion, but not clannish, and continually introducing into their midst English wives and husbands.
Compared to dry hair, wet hair can be easier to manage in a cut/style situation because the added weight and surface tension of the water cause the strands to stretch downward and cling together along the hair's length, holding a line and making it easier for the stylist to create a form.
The couples who cling together can be taken to our hearts because they are neither idealised nor individual but seem embodiments of ordinariness and familiarity, embracing in the mystery of belonging.
Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter or two knives until the mixture resembles fine crumbs and starts to cling together.
Mum Sarah, a 32-year-old teacher, was amazed to see her newborns cling together as medics held them up.
If one magnet is in the stomach and another is in the small intestine, for example, they can cling together and quickly work their way through tissue, perforating the wall or creating a hole.
I think she was waiting,' he whispers in my ear as we cling together.
They seem to cling together when talking about standard tests and classroom activities.