cling to


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Related to cling to: reassert, outlined, call on, ameliorative, scrutinised, overhyped, took over

cling to someone or something

 
1. Lit. to hold on tight to someone or something. The child clung tightly to his mother. As she drifted in the sea, she clung to a floating log.
2. Fig. to hold onto the thought or memory of someone or something; to have a strong emotional attachment to or dependence on someone or something. Her immigrant parents clung to the old ways. Harold clung to the memory of his grandmother.
See also: cling
References in periodicals archive ?
As this happens, those telecommunications companies that cling to such arcane concepts as "revenue per user" or "minute of voice," to cite two commonly used, present-day industry measures, will be as obsolete as vinyl records.
Spiders do cling to ceilings and walls using tiny claws on the ends of their eight legs.
Sunlight filters through shallow water, dappling tiny blades of brown algae that cling to the soft seafloor.
Midway and the Battle of the Atlantic showed how quickly entirely new ways of waging naval war - aircraft carriers, submarines - could rise, threatening the supremacy of nations whose old salts cling to old ways.
Users can save themselves a hundred text messages and the hassle of communicating with multiple people by starting a Private Group Cling to coordinate the spots you want to visit, let friends know when you've arrived and capture pictures, video and audio clips from the night.
This gecko's "sticky" toes help it cling to walls, ceilings--even tornado-blown leaves
But six months later, it's the Bruins who are close to cementing a playoff berth, while the Kings cling to postseason hopes that are largely mathematical.
The shares continue to cling to key support at the nine level as well.
They cling to power instead of sharing it; they cling to knowledge instead of sharing it; they cling to friends instead of sharing them.
PHOTO (Color) Icicles cling to the fruit and branches of lemon trees in a grove in Santa Paula.
Cavities form when bacteria cling to tooth surfaces and turn food sugar into lactic acid.
What: It's obvious that the reactive security philosophy that we cling to -- waiting for damage to be done, then responding -- is broken.
Yet managers, seeing a completely different game to the rest of us, cling to it like George Best clings to opening time.