climb the social ladder

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climb the social ladder

To improve one's position within the hierarchical structure or makeup of a culture, society, or social environment. Miss Dumfey hopes to climb the social ladder by marrying the local diplomat. John's had a chip on his shoulder from being raised in a trailer park, so climbing the social ladder has been his only aim since leaving home.
See also: climb, ladder, social
References in periodicals archive ?
Chip's father, though, has plans for climbing the social ladder, and after the death of his older son, he needs Chip's cooperation to make this happen.
She was steadily climbing the social ladder with her jobs as a nurse, dressmaker and housekeeper.
Proficiency in the English language is being used as a barrier to keep people from climbing the social ladder in the Muslim country, according to the report.
And yet, at the end of their time abroad, these men nearly always returned to Wales, and unlike many of the successful Scots and Irish who served in India they tended not to use their wealth as a means of climbing the social ladder in England.
99 JUST like the books and any other teen-flick of the same premise, this game is all about getting in with the right crowd, as you assume the role of new girl at Octavian Country Day School and take on the challenges of climbing the social ladder to join the ultimate clique, the Pretty Committee.
Annmarie Guzy of the University of South Alabama provides a personal narrative about climbing the social ladder in "A Blue-Collar Honors Story.
TOO POSH TO PRESS hires someone for the job because holding an iron does not fit in with climbing the social ladder.
The story is set in the social whirl of present-day London where Jonathan Rhys-Meyers plays former tennis pro Chris who is hastily climbing the social ladder as a coach at an exclusive club.
They are systematically prevented from climbing the social ladder and can only advance by joining the army or by greasing a lot of palms -- an option that presupposes having connections abroad.
Andrews describes as "a mood of optimism" ("Reunion" 8), authors such as Keckley could portray themselves as climbing the social ladder to new financial and personal heights.
Stop preaching about the virtues of climbing the social ladder.
In "All Grown Up," the familiar babies formerly from the "Rugrats" TV show, are now a tight-knit band of friends between the ages of 8 and 13, who face the same issues kids their age face every day: dealing with parents, peer pressure, seeking independence, grappling with identity, climbing the social ladder and surviving Jr.
We're both climbing the social ladder thanks to the smell of chickpeas wafting down from the middle rungs.
Teachers, policemen and nurses will be surprised to learn they are climbing the social ladder.