climb the wall

climb the wall(s)

Fig. to be very agitated, anxious, bored, or excited. He was home for only three days; then he began to climb the wall. I was climbing the walls to get back to work.
See also: climb, wall

climb the wall

verb
See also: climb, wall
References in classic literature ?
She stroked his head with a half-embarrassed laugh, and replied, - 'I did not know he had attempted to climb the wall.
If the light is in front you must climb the wall, for they will leave the gate locked.
The Israeli military spokeswoman said that the boy was not injured in the shooting, claiming that he tried to climb the wall of the settlement
It is almost impossible to climb the wall without any support.
David Axtell, 42, a British health insurance consultant from Sr, was one of the first to climb the wall with his children Charlotte, nine, and George, 11.
People will be able to climb the wall for free until tomorrow, from 6pm to 10pm.
A Jewish extremist crossed the Magharbeh bridge, which links the gate with the Western Wall, and tried to climb the wall surrounding the mosque and enter it before being prevented by a guard.
Out of Doug and Gerry hurried down the alleyway at the back of Park Lane, and got ready to climb the wall of the yard which hopefully had 1964 on the other side.
YMCA members are encouraged to climb the wall under the watchful eyes of trained volunteers.
step up Cpl Dave MacKenzie helps Steven Wykes climb the wall at Moor End Technology College industry day AN introduction to the world of work was given to students at Moor End Technology College.
Youngsters paid 50p to climb the wall and all the money raised will go towards the Snowball Appeal, backed by the Evening Telegraph and Mercia FM.
They tended to spend more time attempting to climb the wall of the pool or swimming along the wall," Lai says.
It is easy to climb the wall from that side as there are some huge stones lying there.
Thankfully they did not make us climb the wall at the interview.