class


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Related to class: CLAAS

class clown

A mischievous or impudent student who frequently disrupts the class with jokes, pranks, or wry comments as a means of drawing attention to him- or herself. Every teacher has to deal with class clowns eventually.
See also: class, clown

in a class of (one's)/its own

Completely superior to others of one's or its kind. As a lawyer, Janice is truly in a class of her own. The reigning Super Bowl champions continue to play as if they're in a class of their own. The newest car from Ferrari is in a class of its own.
See also: class, of, own

jig (it)

To absent oneself or leave early (from school or work) when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in Australia. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just jig it after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on jigging from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you jig class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: jig

wag (it)

To absent oneself or leave early (from school or work) when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just wag it after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on wagging from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you wag class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: wag

skive (something)

To absent oneself or leave early from something (usually school or work) when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just skive it after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on skiving from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you skive class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: skive

bunk (something)

To absent oneself or leave early from something (usually school or work) when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just bunk it after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on bunking from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you bunk class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: bunk

class warfare

Conflict between different socio-economic classes The politician was accused of trying to promote class warfare with his comments about the haves and the have-nots.
See also: class, warfare

in a class by (one)self

Having no equal. She is the best director in Hollywood right now—she is simply in a class by herself. This new concept car is in a class by itself. It is years ahead of the competition.
See also: class

second-class citizen

One who is deemed less important than others within a society. The waitress was so rude to me that I started feeling like a second-class citizen. We live in this neighborhood, too, and we should be allowed to voice our opinions, instead of being ignored like second-class citizens!
See also: citizen

class (someone or something) with (someone or something)

To group someone or something with similar people or things. I studied hard, so don't class me with the kids who don't care. Please class these bedsheets with others that are the same size.
See also: class

cut class

To miss class, usually intentionally and without a legitimate reason. I can't possibly sit through another class today, so let's just cut class and go to the beach.
See also: class, cut

second best

Someone or something that is inferior to someone or something else. Even though I'd spent weeks working on my project for the science fair, I still came off second best.
See also: second

class someone or something with someone or something

to group someone or something with someone or something considered similar. Please don't class this car with anything you've ever driven before. The sportswriters classed this team with some of the all-time best in history.
See also: class

cut class

 and cut school
to skip a school class or a day of school without an excuse. As a joke, one day all the students cut their math class and went to lunch. Jane was grounded after she cut school last Friday.
See also: class, cut

cut class

Absent oneself from a class or other, usually mandatory event, as in If he cuts one more class he'll fail the course. [Late 1700s]
See also: class, cut

second best

Also, second class. Next after the first in rank or quality, inferior to the best, as in We aren't satisfied with being second best in sales, or This hotel is obviously second class. The first term dates from the first half of the 1400s, the variant from about 1800. Also see come off, def. 2; second class.
See also: second

second class

1. Inferior; see second best.
2. Travel accommodations ranking below the highest or first class, as in Traveling second class on European trains is not only cheaper but gives you more contact with local people . [c. 1840]
3. In the United States and Canada, a category of mail consisting of periodicals and newspapers. [c. 1870]
4. second-class citizen. An individual regarded or treated as inferior to others in status or rights, an underprivileged person. For example, In many countries women still are considered second-class citizens. This term uses second class in the sense of "inferior." [c. 1940]
See also: class, second

a class act

COMMON If someone is a class act, they are very good at what they do. Koeman is a class act. He's got great control and can hit passes from one side of the pitch to the other with amazing accuracy. Hiatt's songs have been recorded by class acts like Bob Dylan and The Everly Brothers.
See also: act, class

a class act

a person or thing displaying impressive and stylish excellence. informal
See also: act, class

be in a class of your, its, etc. own

(also be in a class by yourself, itself, etc.) be much better than any others of the same kind: The winning competitor was in a class by herself.For originality, Leo’s designs are truly in a class of their own.
See also: class, of, own

not be in the same ˈleague/ˈclass/ˈstreet

(informal) be of a much lower standard than somebody/something: He was a good painter, but not in the same league as Picasso.We’re not in the same class as the Swiss ski team. They’re the best in the world.
See also: class, league, not, same, street

ˌsecond ˈbest

not as good as the best; not exactly what you want: The two teams seemed evenly matched, but Arsenal came off second best (= did not win).Sometimes you have to settle for (= be content with) second best.
See also: second

have, etc. a ˌtouch of ˈclass

have, etc. quality, in design, character, etc: His clothes are old and unfashionable, but nevertheless he has a real touch of class.
See also: class, of, touch

class

1. n. high style; elegance. The dame’s got class, but no brains.
2. mod. first-rate; high-class. This was a class suburb just a few years ago.

class act

n. a high-quality act; a high-quality way of doing things. The prof puts on a real class act, but he grades very hard.
See also: act, class

world-class

mod. absolutely top rate. Now this is a world-class computer. Lots and lots of memory.