claim

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claim check

A ticket or receipt used to collect an item that has been deposited or is being held somewhere. Be sure to have your claim check ready or you will not be able to collect your car from the valet.
See also: check, claim

claim the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: claim, ground, high, moral

claim a/the/(one's) life

To result in one's death. This crime spree has already claimed the lives of 10 innocent people—when will the perpetrator be caught? That debilitating illness ultimately claimed her life. After the battle, the victorious country claimed the contested area for itself.
See also: claim, life

claim (something) for (oneself or something)

1. To declare something as one's property or jurisdiction. You can't have his potato chips—I already claimed them for myself! Do you think he might actually claim the throne for himself?
2. To officially request money as repayment for damages. I can't believe he's claiming thousands of dollars for repairs when I barely dented his fender.
See also: claim

claim to fame

The reason why someone or something is famous or well-known. I've heard that name before—what's his claim to fame? Jeff's big claim to fame is being on that reality show for one episode.
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim

To assert one's ownership of or right to something. You can't use this set of skis because someone else already staked a claim to them.
See also: claim, stake

claim a life

Fig. [for something] to take the life of someone. The killer tornado claimed the lives of six people at the trailer park. The athlete's life was claimed in a skiing accident.
See also: claim, life

claim something for someone or something

to declare rights to or control of something for someone, or that something is the property of someone, a group, or a nation. The small country claimed the mountainous area for itself. Roger claimed all the rest of the ice cream for himself.
See also: claim

claim something for something

to make a claim for money in payment for damages. David claimed one thousand dollars for the damaged car. She claimed a lot of money for the amount of harm she experienced.
See also: claim

equate

someone to someone else and equate something to something else to claim that someone is in some manner the same as someone else; to claim that something is in some manner the same as something else. I would equate Tom to Wallywhen it comes to native ability. You cannot equate my car to that jalopy you drive!

lay claim to something

to place a claim on something. Do you really think you can lay claim to that money after all these years? Someone came by and laid claim to the wallet you found.
See also: claim, lay

someone's claim to fame

someone's reason for being well-known or famous. Her claim to fame is that she can recite the entire works of Shakespeare.
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim to someone or something

Fig. to state or record one's claim on someone or something. (Alludes to marking off an area by pounding in wooden stakes.) she staked a claim to Jeff and told all her rivals to stay away. The prospector staked a claim to the gold-rich area.
See also: claim, stake

stake out a claim to something

 and stake out a claim on something
to lay claim to something. The prospector staked out a claim to the promising piece of land. We staked out a claim on two seats at the side of the auditorium.
See also: claim, out, stake

claim check

A receipt for property that has been left or deposited, as in Give me your claim check and I'll pick up your laundry for you. This term most often refers to a receipt for such items as laundry (left for washing), clothes (for dry cleaning), a car (for servicing), or baggage (for short-term storage). [First half of 1900s]
See also: check, claim

lay claim to

Assert one's right to or ownership of, as in "What claim lays she to thee?" (Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors, 3:2). [Late 1500s] Also see stake a claim.
See also: claim, lay

stake a claim

Also, stake out a claim. Indicate something as one's own, as in I'm staking a claim to the drumstick, or She staked out a claim for herself in the insurance business. This term, dating from the mid-1800s, originally meant "register a claim to land by marking it with stakes." It was being used figuratively by the late 1800s.
See also: claim, stake

a claim to fame

COMMON A person or place's claim to fame is something quite important or interesting that they have done or that is connected with them. Barbara Follett's greatest claim to fame is that she taught Labour MPs how to look good on television. The town's ancient castle was its main claim to fame.
See also: claim, fame

lay claim to

To assert one's right to or ownership of.
See also: claim, lay
References in classic literature ?
The currents are too feeble"; second, Gray the CONVERT, who wrote frankly to Bell in 1877, "I do not claim the credit of inventing it"; and third, Gray the CLAIMANT, who endeavored to prove in 1886 that he was the original inventor.
Bell discovered a new art--that of transmitting speech by electricity, and his claim is not as broad as his invention.
And the third was the very significant fact that no one challenged Bell's claim to be the original inventor of the telephone until his patent was seventeen months old.
Daylight staked a claim in his own name adjoining the three he had purchased with his plug tobacco.
In return, he arranged to stake a claim for him, which he was to record when he passed through Forty Mile.
Even Daylight disliked the looks of Eldorado; but, still riding his hunch, he bought a half share in one claim on it for half a sack of flour.
I don't pretend to much knowledge of the subject," she said; "but I should be surprised indeed if I discovered that you had any claim on me which the law could enforce.
And, moreover, tell him I claim that you, too, miserable sinner as you ar', should be given up to justice.
The Teton chief has spoken very plainly," the old man continued; "he will not give you the lady, to whom the Lord in heaven knows you have no claim, unless it be such as the wolf has to the lamb.
Should my opinion be asked, thus far will I give it in your favour; that is to say, it is my belief your life has been innocent enough, touching any great offences that you may have committed, though honesty compels me to add, that I think all you can lay claim to, on the score of activity in deeds, will not amount to any thing worth naming in the great account.
You have heard us grant that claim, and welcome it.
New York has always been a commercial community, and there are not more than three families in it who can claim an aristocratic origin in the real sense of the word.
Nay, I absolutely claim a property in all such sentiments the moment they are transcribed into my writings, and I expect all readers henceforwards to regard them as purely and entirely my own.
I am happy to say that there appears to be no reason why your claim should not be fully admitted.
Nearly two-thirds of carriers' personnel are involved in some aspect of claims processing; claims payouts consume almost 80% of a property/casualty company's annual revenue.