claim


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

claim check

A ticket or receipt used to collect an item that has been deposited or is being held somewhere. Be sure to have your claim check ready or you will not be able to collect your car from the valet.
See also: check, claim

claim the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: claim, ground, high, moral

claim a life

Fig. [for something] to take the life of someone. The killer tornado claimed the lives of six people at the trailer park. The athlete's life was claimed in a skiing accident.
See also: claim, life

claim something for someone or something

to declare rights to or control of something for someone, or that something is the property of someone, a group, or a nation. The small country claimed the mountainous area for itself. Roger claimed all the rest of the ice cream for himself.
See also: claim

claim something for something

to make a claim for money in payment for damages. David claimed one thousand dollars for the damaged car. She claimed a lot of money for the amount of harm she experienced.
See also: claim

equate

someone to someone else and equate something to something else to claim that someone is in some manner the same as someone else; to claim that something is in some manner the same as something else. I would equate Tom to Wallywhen it comes to native ability. You cannot equate my car to that jalopy you drive!

lay claim to something

to place a claim on something. Do you really think you can lay claim to that money after all these years? Someone came by and laid claim to the wallet you found.
See also: claim, lay

someone's claim to fame

someone's reason for being well-known or famous. Her claim to fame is that she can recite the entire works of Shakespeare.
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim to someone or something

Fig. to state or record one's claim on someone or something. (Alludes to marking off an area by pounding in wooden stakes.) she staked a claim to Jeff and told all her rivals to stay away. The prospector staked a claim to the gold-rich area.
See also: claim, stake

stake out a claim to something

 and stake out a claim on something
to lay claim to something. The prospector staked out a claim to the promising piece of land. We staked out a claim on two seats at the side of the auditorium.
See also: claim, out, stake

somebody's claim to fame

the reason why someone is famous Chan's claim to fame is that he does his own stunts in his movies.
Usage notes: sometimes used of places: The restaurant is Philadelphia's latest claim to fame.
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim (to something)

also stake your claim (to something)
to show that you believe something is yours In recent years, several big stores have staked a claim to the wealthy shoppers in this area. Stevens has staked a claim to a new brand of techno music with a series of exciting concerts.
Etymology: from the idea of marking land that is not owned by someone with stakes (pointed sticks) to show it is yours
See also: claim, stake

stake a claim (to something)

to announce that something belongs to you Every kind of group you can think of has staked a claim to space on the Internet.
Usage notes: also used in the form stake your claim: He staked his claim as a liberal.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of stake a claim (to mark with posts a piece of land belonging to the government that you claim for yourself)
See also: claim, stake

somebody's claim to fame

a reason for a person or place to be well known or famous The town's main claim to fame is that the President was born here. (humorous) His only claim to fame is that he nearly met Princess Diana.
See stake a/ claim
See also: claim, fame

stake a/your claim

to make it clear that you want something, and that you think you deserve to get it (often + to ) Descendants of the original settlers are going to court to stake their claim to the land. In order to stake a claim for world prominence in astronomy, the university is building a huge new optical telescope.
See also: claim, stake

claim check

A receipt for property that has been left or deposited, as in Give me your claim check and I'll pick up your laundry for you. This term most often refers to a receipt for such items as laundry (left for washing), clothes (for dry cleaning), a car (for servicing), or baggage (for short-term storage). [First half of 1900s]
See also: check, claim

lay claim to

Assert one's right to or ownership of, as in "What claim lays she to thee?" (Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors, 3:2). [Late 1500s] Also see stake a claim.
See also: claim, lay

stake a claim

Also, stake out a claim. Indicate something as one's own, as in I'm staking a claim to the drumstick, or She staked out a claim for herself in the insurance business. This term, dating from the mid-1800s, originally meant "register a claim to land by marking it with stakes." It was being used figuratively by the late 1800s.
See also: claim, stake

lay claim to

To assert one's right to or ownership of.
See also: claim, lay
References in classic literature ?
The best policy, he suggested, was to withdraw their claims and make a settlement.
But Gray could never forget that he had seemed to be, for a time, so close to the golden prize; and seven years after he had been set aside by the Western Union agreement, he reappeared with claims that had grown larger and more definite.
His ruling passion of imitation, apparently, was not diminished by the loss of his telephone claims, as he came to public view again in 1903 as a trailer of Marconi.
In return, he arranged to stake a claim for him, which he was to record when he passed through Forty Mile.
One day in December Daylight filled a pan from bed rock on his own claim and carried it into his cabin.
Even Daylight disliked the looks of Eldorado; but, still riding his hunch, he bought a half share in one claim on it for half a sack of flour.
Nope, but I got a hunch," was the retort, "and I tell you-all it's cheaper than dirt to ride her at the rate of three plugs for three claims.
I have already recognized you as a lady in embarrassed circumstances, who has peculiar claims on my consideration and forbearance.
You talk of my peculiar claims on your forbearance.
Lady Janet decided that five years' salary immediately given, and future assistance rendered if necessary, would represent a fit remembrance of the late Colonel Roseberry's claims, and a liberal pecuniary acknowledgment of any harshness of treatment which Grace might have sustained at her hands.
Of course, he said, for he claims to have more than all men.
And, moreover, tell him I claim that you, too, miserable sinner as you ar', should be given up to justice.
The Teton chief has spoken very plainly," the old man continued; "he will not give you the lady, to whom the Lord in heaven knows you have no claim, unless it be such as the wolf has to the lamb.
Should my opinion be asked, thus far will I give it in your favour; that is to say, it is my belief your life has been innocent enough, touching any great offences that you may have committed, though honesty compels me to add, that I think all you can lay claim to, on the score of activity in deeds, will not amount to any thing worth naming in the great account.
Even the States which brought forward claims, in contradiction to ours, seemed more solicitous to dismember this State, than to establish their own pretensions.