circle around

(redirected from circles around)

circle around

1. To move in a circular path, perhaps to come back to one's original location. A specific person or thing does not have to be stated after "around" to convey this meaning. Does anyone know why helicopters are circling around outside our building? I can't wait for you here because I'm blocking traffic—I'll have to circle around.
2. To move something in a circular path. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is often used between "circle" and "around." Take this tray of hors d'oeuvres and circle it around to all the people sitting in the living room.
3. To form a circle around someone or something. The shower guests circled around the bride-to-be as she opened presents. The kids circled around the newly hatched chicks in awe.
4. To focus on someone or something. But it's Beth's surprise party, not yours, so all the decorations and games should circle around her and her alone.
5. To occur again in the usual pattern or schedule. I am so ready for summer to circle around again because I hate the cold!
6. To envelope someone or something in something, often a material. In this usage, a noun is often used between "circle" and "around." Now circle that piece of fabric around the mannequin like this.
See also: around, circle

circle around (over someone or something)

[for a plane or a bird] to fly around above someone, something, or some place. The plane circled around over us for a few minutes and then went on. It circled around over the field.
See also: around, circle

circle around

v.
1. To proceed in a circle around someone or something: We circled around the block until they were ready to be picked up.
2. To move something in a circle around someone or something: We circled the dish around the table so everyone could try some.
3. To wrap or place something in a circle around someone or something: We circled the ribbon around the pole.
4. To form a circle around someone or something: The children circled around the storyteller.
5. To proceed in a circle: The plane circled around until it was cleared for landing.
6. To be centered around someone or something: These movie stars think everything circles around them.
7. To come by way of rotation: When the holiday season circles around, I want to have all my shopping done.
See also: around, circle
References in classic literature ?
Further, I--or John Barleycorn, for it was the same thing--told Scotty that he might be a deep-sea sailor and know the last rope on the great deep-sea ships, but that when it came to small-boat sailing I could beat him hands down and sail circles around him.
CIRCLES AROUND THE SUN: IN SEARCH OF A LOST BROTHER tells of the author's brother, fourteen years her senior, who descended into paranoid schizophrenia when she was a young girl.
They set up a golf hole on a ramp and used a projector to shine a ring of circles around the hole.
Dark circles around the moon are more common than you realize.
Martin Hannigan, 53, from Cootehill, Co Cavan, put up road signs and drew warning circles around potholes to alert motorists.
The dancers maintain this rhythm (typically, with one partner's left hand clasping the other's right) as they navigate through turns--side to side, behind the back, or with one partner on bended knee, hand held out like a compass as the other literally dances circles around him.
The people lined up in two circles around the maypole and mimicked what they were singing about in their dance.
The plates' coating causes them to seem to impede and transfer light simultaneously, to appear as both substance and void, and to offer an infinity of smoky tones as the viewer circles around each cube.
United's Freddy Adu runs circles around seasoned veterans.
Karen Kwiatowski, a former policy planning specialist in the Pentagon, reports: "The Iranians are running circles around as in Iraq.
The most obvious path to take when you decide to begin this journey is with the people in concentric circles around Martin Luther King Jr.
When the town circles around a local boy and his mother, she is pressed to find the killer, In doing so, she almost loses her best friend.
It circles around the graves of our fathers, and we will never give up these graves to any man.
Now generally used as the name for the type of fast, syncopated music that originated among the Creole community in New Orleans in the late 19th century and arrived in fashionable New York circles around 1915.