chronic

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chronic

n. very high quality marijuana containing lots of THC. (Probably from the association of THC with the use of marijuana in cases of chronic pain.) Where can I get some genuine chronic.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper we (1) analyze the frequency and costs associated with PACs for six chronic conditions using a national commercially insured claims database and look at the variation in PAC costs across all states, ranking them into decries; (2) estimate the financial impact in a prototypical practice paid under the Prometheus model if PACs were reduced to the second decile of observed PAC rates in the national database; and (3) determine the feasibility of reducing PACs in some clinical settings through a comprehensive review of the medical literature focused on the improvement of care quality for patients with chronic illnesses.
htm): CHF, coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and asthma.
It is a continuing offense and differs from most other offenses in the fact that [it] is chronic rather than acute; that it continues after it is complete and subjects the offender to arrest at any time before he reforms.
Justice Marshall, writing for the plurality, upheld Powell's conviction, and reasoned that the State may charge a chronic alcoholic with public intoxication without violating the Eighth Amendment.
The proportion of chronic offenders was virtually the same: 982 young men (7.
For each young chronic offender who comes before him, a juvenile-court judge typically moves toward more severe punishments and costly interventions in five or more small steps.
Disease management is the proactive management or prevention of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and asthma, through the deployment of practice guidelines focused on proven treatments.
Employers, payers, and DMOs alike are turning with increasing interest to wellness initiatives and other health-management programs for healthy or undiagnosed individuals who have not yet generated claims for chronic or other conditions," said Matheson.
For these reasons and others, lateness that has become chronic has to be handled.
The emphasis should be on the fact that chronic lateness is the problem, not just lateness.
Similar conclusions emerged when they compared the predicted probability of offending through age seventy for chronic and non-chronic juvenile offenders, as well as whether the sample was stratified by family and childhood risk.
46) Based on their quantitative analysis, they conclude that "life-course-persistent offenders [serious, high-rate chronic offenders] are difficult, if not impossible, to identify prospectively using a wide variety of childhood and adolescent risk factors.