choice

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Related to choicest: whimsically, withering, called off

drug of choice

1. An illicit substance one is addicted to or tends to prefer. I dabbled with a few different recreational drugs in college, but marijuana was my drug of choice.
2. The favored pharmaceutical treatment for a given medical condition or ailment. Lithium has long been the drug of choice for many physicians to treat depression and bipolar disorder.
3. By extension, any habit, activity, or vice that one is particularly fond of or dependent upon. A lot of people resort to drugs or alcohol to cope with their problems, but exercise has always been my drug of choice. Coffee became my drug of choice after working as a barista for three years during college.
See also: choice, drug, of

be spoiled for choice

To have an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoiled for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoilt for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in UK. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoilt for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoilt for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Beggars can't be choosers.

Prov. If someone gives you something you asked for, you should not complain about what you get. I asked Joe to lend me his bicycle, and he sent me this old, rusty one. But beggars can't be choosers. Jill: Let me wear your green dress; I don't like the blue one you lent me. Jane: Beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

by choice

due to conscious choice; on purpose. I do this kind of thing by choice. No one makes me do it. I didn't go to this college by choice. It was the closest one to home.
See also: choice

Hobson's choice

the choice between taking what is offered and getting nothing at all. (From the name of a stable owner in the seventeenth century who always hired out the horse nearest the door.) We didn't really want that particular hotel, but it was a case of Hobson's choice. We booked very late and there was nothing else left. If you want a yellow car, it's Hobson's choice. The garage has only one.
See also: choice

Beggars can't be choosers.

something that you say which means when you cannot have exactly what you want, you must accept whatever you can get I would have preferred a house of my own rather than sharing but I suppose beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

be spoilt for choice

  (mainly British) also be spoiled for choice (mainly American)
to have so many good possible choices that it is difficult to make a decision With 51 flavours of ice-cream to choose from you are spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Hobson's choice

a situation in which it seems that you can choose between different things or actions, but there is really only one thing that you can take or do
Usage notes: Thomas Hobson was a man who kept horses and did not give people a choice about which horse they could have.
It's Hobson's choice, because if I don't agree to do what they want, I'll lose my job.
See also: choice

beggars can't be choosers

Those in dire need must be content with what they get. For example, The cheapest model will have to do-beggars can't be choosers. This expression was familiar enough to be included in John Heywood's 1546 collection of proverbs.
See also: beggar

by choice

Deliberately, as a matter of preference. For example, No one told me to come; I'm here by choice. This expression replaced the earlier with choice, used from about 1500.
See also: choice

Hobson's choice

An apparently free choice that actually offers no alternative. For example, My dad said if I wanted the car I could have it tonight or not at all-that's Hobson's choice . This expression alludes to Thomas Hobson of Cambridge, England, who rented horses and allowed each customer to take only the horse nearest the stable door. [Mid-1600s]
See also: choice

of choice

Preferred above others, as in A strike is the union's weapon of choice. Used with other prepositions ( by, for, with), all meaning "by preference," this idiom dates from about 1300.
See also: choice, of

pay your money and take your choice

Also, you pays your money and takes your choice. Since you're paying, it's your decision, as in We can take the train or the bus-you pays your money and takes your choice. This term first appeared in the English humor magazine Punch in the mid-1800s and has been repeated ever since.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

choice

mod. nice; cool. We had a choice time at Tom’s party.

of choice

Preferred above others of the same kind or set: "the much used leveraged buyout as the weapon of choice" (Alison Leigh Cowan).
See also: choice, of

Hobson's choice

No choice at all, take it or leave it. Thomas Hobson ran a livery stable in Cambridge, England, in the 16th century. He had a simple policy about renting out his horses: you took what he gave you or you went horseless (some accounts say he rented whichever animal was in the stall nearest the door). Hobson's spirit lives on in the joke about a passenger aboard El Al Airlines who asked the flight attendant what the choice of dinner was. She replied with a smile, “The choice is yes or no.”
See also: choice
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it is specifically noted that Abel brought the choicest of the firstlings of his flock (Gen.
The choicest plants he munches through, Hostas, tulips, green beans, too.
Plus the best, choicest, lines from Maggie Smith as the Dowager Duchess Violet.
May the Lord lavish his choicest heavenly reward on our new Vicar of Christ Francis 1.
The Newmarket trainer has been sent three of his choicest homebred two-yearolds, including a colt from the first crop of the mighty Sea The Stars.
May the Lord lavish his choicest heavenly reward upon our new Vicar of Christ, Francis.
The booth lured countless visitors who had arrived to taste for free, the choicest Ghanaian premium Golden Tree Chocolate without artificial additives.
Watch your angel-face sing and dance along the groovy and snazzy poems in this wonderful volume of the choicest traditional common nursery rhymes.
One of the choicest specimens was a rare Henry III silver coin dated 1250.
In the past few years, we have been responsible for the fit-outs of many of Fifth Avenue's choicest stores, culminating in a visible uplift of this magnificent Avenue.
and hand picks some of the choicest pieces for The Diamond Vault.
In between, however, lie the choicest parts of the book.
European general manager of corporate affairs Michael Mullen said: "They highlight the fact that Heinz has a responsibility to help consumers make informed and healthy choicest.
If choosing what to wear to school is the choicest part of your morning, this news may blacken your mood: Strict dress codes are a hot new trend in public schools.
Yet one roars with administrations (David, Solomon), and swords, and the sentinels who go about the city in order to protect the space of the masses, while the other seems to be a place of flowing streams, filled with the choicest fruits, and a fountain of "living water" at the center (4.