choice

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drug of choice

1. An illicit substance one is addicted to or tends to prefer. I dabbled with a few different recreational drugs in college, but marijuana was my drug of choice.
2. The favored pharmaceutical treatment for a given medical condition or ailment. Lithium has long been the drug of choice for many physicians to treat depression and bipolar disorder.
3. By extension, any habit, activity, or vice that one is particularly fond of or dependent upon. A lot of people resort to drugs or alcohol to cope with their problems, but exercise has always been my drug of choice. Coffee became my drug of choice after working as a barista for three years during college.
See also: choice, drug, of

be spoiled for choice

To have an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoiled for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoilt for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in UK. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoilt for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoilt for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Beggars can't be choosers.

Prov. If someone gives you something you asked for, you should not complain about what you get. I asked Joe to lend me his bicycle, and he sent me this old, rusty one. But beggars can't be choosers. Jill: Let me wear your green dress; I don't like the blue one you lent me. Jane: Beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

by choice

due to conscious choice; on purpose. I do this kind of thing by choice. No one makes me do it. I didn't go to this college by choice. It was the closest one to home.
See also: choice

Hobson's choice

the choice between taking what is offered and getting nothing at all. (From the name of a stable owner in the seventeenth century who always hired out the horse nearest the door.) We didn't really want that particular hotel, but it was a case of Hobson's choice. We booked very late and there was nothing else left. If you want a yellow car, it's Hobson's choice. The garage has only one.
See also: choice

Beggars can't be choosers.

something that you say which means when you cannot have exactly what you want, you must accept whatever you can get I would have preferred a house of my own rather than sharing but I suppose beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

be spoilt for choice

  (mainly British) also be spoiled for choice (mainly American)
to have so many good possible choices that it is difficult to make a decision With 51 flavours of ice-cream to choose from you are spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Hobson's choice

a situation in which it seems that you can choose between different things or actions, but there is really only one thing that you can take or do
Usage notes: Thomas Hobson was a man who kept horses and did not give people a choice about which horse they could have.
It's Hobson's choice, because if I don't agree to do what they want, I'll lose my job.
See also: choice

beggars can't be choosers

Those in dire need must be content with what they get. For example, The cheapest model will have to do-beggars can't be choosers. This expression was familiar enough to be included in John Heywood's 1546 collection of proverbs.
See also: beggar

by choice

Deliberately, as a matter of preference. For example, No one told me to come; I'm here by choice. This expression replaced the earlier with choice, used from about 1500.
See also: choice

Hobson's choice

An apparently free choice that actually offers no alternative. For example, My dad said if I wanted the car I could have it tonight or not at all-that's Hobson's choice . This expression alludes to Thomas Hobson of Cambridge, England, who rented horses and allowed each customer to take only the horse nearest the stable door. [Mid-1600s]
See also: choice

of choice

Preferred above others, as in A strike is the union's weapon of choice. Used with other prepositions ( by, for, with), all meaning "by preference," this idiom dates from about 1300.
See also: choice, of

pay your money and take your choice

Also, you pays your money and takes your choice. Since you're paying, it's your decision, as in We can take the train or the bus-you pays your money and takes your choice. This term first appeared in the English humor magazine Punch in the mid-1800s and has been repeated ever since.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

choice

mod. nice; cool. We had a choice time at Tom’s party.

of choice

Preferred above others of the same kind or set: "the much used leveraged buyout as the weapon of choice" (Alison Leigh Cowan).
See also: choice, of

Hobson's choice

No choice at all, take it or leave it. Thomas Hobson ran a livery stable in Cambridge, England, in the 16th century. He had a simple policy about renting out his horses: you took what he gave you or you went horseless (some accounts say he rented whichever animal was in the stall nearest the door). Hobson's spirit lives on in the joke about a passenger aboard El Al Airlines who asked the flight attendant what the choice of dinner was. She replied with a smile, “The choice is yes or no.”
See also: choice
References in periodicals archive ?
Originally an abortion choicer, she changed sides in 1976.
Some libertarian abortion choicers claim there is a solution.
Abortion choicers often talk as if abortion is something a pregnant woman does only to herself, as if abortion were a victimless-crime debate.
Abortion choicers often insist that "capacity" refers only to the ability to demonstrate reason and choice right now.
Most abortion choicers probably oppose equating fetuses with comatose and retarded humans.
32) And it has been argued vigorously among abortion choicers.
If abortion choicers could disprove that abortion is homicide-to the satisfaction of their side at least--would they not advertise instead, "Nine Reasons Why Abortion Is Not Homicide"?
Abortion choicers try to get around the intellectual chaos on their side by saying, "Let the woman decide.
What abortion choicers are saying is that in any pregnancy, the woman's liberty is paramount.
Because most abortion choicers recoil at a "right" to a dead fetus, they prefer to use euphemisms for abortion, such as "pro-choice," "pregnancy termination," and "reproductive rights.
Interestingly, even most abortion choicers consider gross neglect and outright abandonment to be criminal behavior.
How quickly all the ingredients are assembled remains to be seen, but one or two of the choicer ones are available to Bruce again at Bradford.
Later I introduced some choicer varieties, such as the tomato-red "Inverewe", and the elegant drooping bells of the wild Tibetan Primula alpicola.
King Edward VIII's abdication speech, broadcast to the nation from Windsor Castle on 11 December 1936, was a remarkably courageo us, revealing and dignified declaration, almost Churchillian in tone - indeed, Winston Churchill may well have been responsible for some of its choicer turns of phrase.