choice


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drug of choice

1. An illicit substance one is addicted to or tends to prefer. I dabbled with a few different recreational drugs in college, but marijuana was my drug of choice.
2. The favored pharmaceutical treatment for a given medical condition or ailment. Lithium has long been the drug of choice for many physicians to treat depression and bipolar disorder.
3. By extension, any habit, activity, or vice that one is particularly fond of or dependent upon. A lot of people resort to drugs or alcohol to cope with their problems, but exercise has always been my drug of choice. Coffee became my drug of choice after working as a barista for three years during college.
See also: choice, drug, of

be spoiled for choice

To have an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoiled for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoilt for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in UK. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoilt for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoilt for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Beggars can't be choosers.

Prov. If someone gives you something you asked for, you should not complain about what you get. I asked Joe to lend me his bicycle, and he sent me this old, rusty one. But beggars can't be choosers. Jill: Let me wear your green dress; I don't like the blue one you lent me. Jane: Beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

by choice

due to conscious choice; on purpose. I do this kind of thing by choice. No one makes me do it. I didn't go to this college by choice. It was the closest one to home.
See also: choice

Hobson's choice

the choice between taking what is offered and getting nothing at all. (From the name of a stable owner in the seventeenth century who always hired out the horse nearest the door.) We didn't really want that particular hotel, but it was a case of Hobson's choice. We booked very late and there was nothing else left. If you want a yellow car, it's Hobson's choice. The garage has only one.
See also: choice

Beggars can't be choosers.

something that you say which means when you cannot have exactly what you want, you must accept whatever you can get I would have preferred a house of my own rather than sharing but I suppose beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

be spoilt for choice

  (mainly British) also be spoiled for choice (mainly American)
to have so many good possible choices that it is difficult to make a decision With 51 flavours of ice-cream to choose from you are spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Hobson's choice

a situation in which it seems that you can choose between different things or actions, but there is really only one thing that you can take or do
Usage notes: Thomas Hobson was a man who kept horses and did not give people a choice about which horse they could have.
It's Hobson's choice, because if I don't agree to do what they want, I'll lose my job.
See also: choice

beggars can't be choosers

Those in dire need must be content with what they get. For example, The cheapest model will have to do-beggars can't be choosers. This expression was familiar enough to be included in John Heywood's 1546 collection of proverbs.
See also: beggar

by choice

Deliberately, as a matter of preference. For example, No one told me to come; I'm here by choice. This expression replaced the earlier with choice, used from about 1500.
See also: choice

Hobson's choice

An apparently free choice that actually offers no alternative. For example, My dad said if I wanted the car I could have it tonight or not at all-that's Hobson's choice . This expression alludes to Thomas Hobson of Cambridge, England, who rented horses and allowed each customer to take only the horse nearest the stable door. [Mid-1600s]
See also: choice

of choice

Preferred above others, as in A strike is the union's weapon of choice. Used with other prepositions ( by, for, with), all meaning "by preference," this idiom dates from about 1300.
See also: choice, of

pay your money and take your choice

Also, you pays your money and takes your choice. Since you're paying, it's your decision, as in We can take the train or the bus-you pays your money and takes your choice. This term first appeared in the English humor magazine Punch in the mid-1800s and has been repeated ever since.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

choice

mod. nice; cool. We had a choice time at Tom’s party.

of choice

Preferred above others of the same kind or set: "the much used leveraged buyout as the weapon of choice" (Alison Leigh Cowan).
See also: choice, of

Hobson's choice

No choice at all, take it or leave it. Thomas Hobson ran a livery stable in Cambridge, England, in the 16th century. He had a simple policy about renting out his horses: you took what he gave you or you went horseless (some accounts say he rented whichever animal was in the stall nearest the door). Hobson's spirit lives on in the joke about a passenger aboard El Al Airlines who asked the flight attendant what the choice of dinner was. She replied with a smile, “The choice is yes or no.”
See also: choice
References in periodicals archive ?
CHOICE MOVIE: COMEDY<br>Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian
The consumer research conducted by the board and MeringCarson led directly to the development of the Wise Choices campaign.
Every choice implies at least two options, each of which has positive and negative consequences.
But an interim effort offering seniors a choice of drug discount cards doesn't inspire confidence.
I took the evidence to indicate that perhaps we can't just assume that increased choice means increased freedom.
In addition, Choice Hotels is committed to recruiting new minority franchisees.
When unemployed, Anthony's mother, Valerie, relied on the choice program to send him to St.
Just remember, giving them a choice doesn't mean getting them to do it your favorite way.
Ladd argues, for instance: "The evidence simply does not support the claims of those who argue in favor of more parental choice and competition on the instrumental grounds that it will make an education system significantly more productive than it would otherwise be.
The next step to reflect this awareness of individual choice would be to use a term that linguistically represents the concept that an individual makes a continuous choice in obtaining work (or not) while in the "placement" process.
In the following two essays, written independently of each other, three humanists examine charitable choice and what it means for U.
It seems it was designed for plans giving employees more choice.
Until Gore's May 24 speech at a Salvation Army facility, charitable choice has been most closely identified with its lead congressional sponsor, Sen.
Call Choice visual voicemail also can be used by people who are not Hawaiian Telcom wireless customers.