chin

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Related to chinned: chin up

have more chins than a Chinese phone book

To be exceptionally or exceedingly fat, i.e., having multiple rolls of fat (chins) on one's neck. Used as a humorous insult, the phrase is a (somewhat derogatory) pun on the word chin and the supposed commonness of "Chin" as a Chinese surname. Your mama is so fat, she has more chins than a Chinese phone book!
See also: book, chin, Chinese, have, more, phone

chin music

Fig. Inf. talk; conversation. Whenever those two get together, you can be sure there'll be plenty of chin music. Bill just loves to hear himself talk. He'll make chin music for hours at a time.
See also: chin, music

chuck someone under the chin

to tap someone, as a child, lightly under the chin, as a sign of affection. He said hello to little Mary and chucked her under the chin. Please don't chuck me under the chin! I am not a child, you know!
See also: chin, chuck

keep one's chin up

Fig. to keep one's spirits high; to act brave and confident. Keep your chin up, John. Things will get better. Just keep your chin up and tell the judge exactly what happened.
See also: chin, keep, up

Keep your chin up.

Fig. an expression of encouragement to someone who has to bear some emotional burdens. (Fixed order.) Fred: I really can't take much more of this. Jane: Keep your chin up. Things will get better. John: Smile, Fred. Keep your chin up. Fred: I guess you're right. I just get so depressed when I think of this mess I'm in.
See also: chin, keep, up

make chin music

Fig. to talk or chatter. We sat around all evening making chin music. You were making chin music when you should have been listening.
See also: chin, make, music

take it on the chin

 and take it on the nose 
1. Lit. to stand up to something adverse, such as criticism. (Fig. on taking a direct punch to the head in boxing.) They laid some blunt criticism on him, but he took it on the chin. I knew he could take it on the nose.
2. Fig. to receive the full brunt of something. Why do I have to take it on the chin for something I didn't do? If you did it, you have to learn to take it on the chin.
See also: chin, on, take

take something on the chin

 
1. Lit. to absorb a blow on the chin. The boxer tried to duck but took the blow on the chin.
2. Fig. to experience and endure bad news or other trouble. The bad news was a real shock, but John took it on the chin. The worst luck comes my way, and I always end up taking it on the chin.
See also: chin, on, take

wag one's chin

Rur. to talk. She loves to visit. She'll wag her chin for hours. He was on the phone, wagging his chin to his buddy.
See also: chin, wag

Chin up!

  (old-fashioned)
something that you say to someone in a difficult situation in order to encourage them to be brave and to try not to be sad Chin up, you'll feel better after a few days' rest.
See also: chin

take it on the chin

 
1. to be brave and not to complain when bad things happen to you or people criticize you Atkinson took it all on the chin, though some members of his team were very upset by the criticism they received.
2. to have a lot of bad things happen to you or to be criticized a lot The company has been taking it on the chin in recent months, but the future looks much brighter now and their sales are picking up.
See be up to ears in
See also: chin, on, take

be up to your ears/eyeballs/eyes in something

  (British, American & Australian) also be up to your chin in something (American)
to have too much of something, especially work We're up to our eyeballs in decorating at the moment.
See also: ear, up

keep one's chin up

Be stalwart and courageous in a difficult situation, as in Don't let the loan officer intimidate you; keep your chin up, or Despite all the difficulty, he kept his chin up. This expression alludes to a posture of firm resolution. [First half of 1900s]
See also: chin, keep, up

lead with one's chin

Take a risk, behave without caution. For example, Gordon always says exactly what he thinks; he never minds leading with his chin. This term alludes to a boxer leaving his chin, a vulnerable point, unprotected. [Mid-1900s]
See also: chin, lead

take it on the chin

Suffer adversity or defeat, as in Paul really took it on the chin today when he got fired for missing a deadline. This idiom alludes to taking a physical blow on the chin. [First half of 1900s]
See also: chin, on, take

take it on the chin

and take it on the nose
1. tv. to stand up to something adverse, such as criticism. (Chin is more common.) They laid some rude chops on him, but he took it on the chin.
2. tv. to receive the full brunt of something. Why do I have to take it on the nose for something I didn’t do?
See also: chin, on, take

wag one’s chin

tv. to talk or jabber; to chatter aimlessly. The two old buzzards sat on the park bench wagging their chins all afternoon.
See also: chin, wag

keep (one's) chin up

To be stalwart, courageous, or optimistic in the face of difficulty.
See also: chin, keep, up

take it on the chin

Slang
To endure punishment, suffering, or defeat.
See also: chin, on, take