chime

(redirected from chimed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

chime in

1. To join in a discussion about something; to offer one's thoughts. When I heard them discussing my department, I just had to chime in with my own suggestions.
2. To join in and harmonize, as of a singer joining others. OK, so when do we chime in on this song?
3. To compliment something well. Your idea really chimes in with our vision for the project.
See also: chime

ring (one's) chimes

1. To render one stunned, insensible, or unconscious, as from a physical blow or the effects of a drug. I could hear him bad-mouthing my girlfriend, so I went over and rang his chimes with a single left hook to the eye. Be careful with this stuff—it will really ring your chimes if you take too much at once.
2. To be keenly attractive, interesting, or exciting to one. A lot of my friends are obsessed with going out and playing basketball or soccer, but reading a good novel is what rings my chimes. If I'm honest, he isn't the type of man who would normally ring my chimes, but he was so affable and funny that I felt attracted to him nonetheless.
See also: chime, ring

chime in (with something)

Fig. to add a comment to the discussion. Little Billy chimed in with a suggestion. He chimed in too late; the meeting was breaking up.
See also: chime

chime in

1. Join in harmoniously or in unison, either literally (with music) or figuratively (joining a conversation to express agreement). For example, In this passage I want the altos to chime in with the tenors, or When Mary agreed, her sister chimed in that she'd join her. The literal usage was first recorded in 1681, the figurative in 1838.
2. chime in with. Be in agreement or compatible with, as in His views chime in with the paper's editorial stance. [Early 1700s]
See also: chime

ring one's chimes

Arouse one's attention, excite one, as in That kind of music really rings my chimes. [Slang; 1970]
See also: chime, ring

chime in

v.
1. To join in harmoniously with someone or something: The carolers began singing and everyone chimed in.
2. To interrupt someone or join a conversation suddenly, especially with an uninvited opinion: The kids were talking among themselves when the teacher chimed in.
See also: chime
References in periodicals archive ?
It last chimed in 1937 - before the outbreak of the Second World War - and families living near to St Mary's Church, in Ansty Road, Walsgrave, feared they would never hear it strike the hour again.