chestnut


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Related to chestnut: American chestnut

pull (one's) chestnuts out of the fire

To do a difficult, and often dangerous, task for someone else's benefit. David really pulled my chestnuts out of the fire that time he saved me from drowning. I can't believe my car broke down on this desolate road late at night—thank you so much for pulling my chestnuts out of the fire and picking me up!
See also: chestnut, fire, of, out, pull

old chestnut

A topic, saying, or joke that has been repeated so much that it has become boring or irksome. Whether there's truth in it or not, I can't stand that old chestnut "follow your heart."
See also: chestnut, old

old chestnut

A stale joke, story, or saying, as in Dad keeps on telling that old chestnut about how many psychiatrists it takes to change a light bulb . This expression comes from William Dimond's play, The Broken Sword (1816), in which one character keeps repeating the same stories, one of them about a cork tree, and is interrupted each time by another character who says "Chestnut, you mean . . . I have heard you tell the joke twenty-seven times and I am sure it was a chestnut."
See also: chestnut, old

an old chestnut

or

a hoary old chestnut

mainly BRITISH
COMMON If you describe something that is said or written as an old chestnut or a hoary old chestnut, you mean that it has been repeated so often that it is no longer interesting. Finally, how do you answer that old interview chestnut: `Why should I hire you?' The film is based on the hoary old chestnut of good twin/bad twin, separated at birth, final fatal meeting — you get the idea.
See also: chestnut, old

pull someone's chestnuts out of the fire

or

pull the chestnuts out of the fire

OLD-FASHIONED
If you pull someone's chestnuts out of the fire or pull the chestnuts out of the fire, you save someone from a very difficult situation which they have caused themselves. It's not our business, pulling their chestnuts out of the fire. The President tried to use the CIA to pull the chestnuts out of the fire. Note: This expression is based on the fable of the cat and the monkey. The cat wanted to get some roast chestnuts out of the fire but did not want to burn its paws, so it persuaded the monkey to do the job instead.
See also: chestnut, fire, of, out, pull

an old chestnut

a joke, story, or subject that has become tedious and boring as a result of its age and constant repetition.
The most likely source for this sense of chestnut is in the following exchange between two characters, Zavior and Pablo, in William Dimond 's play Broken Sword ( 1816 ): ZAVIOR…When suddenly from the thick boughs of a cork tree— PABLO. (Jumping up) A chesnut, Captain, a chesnut…Captain, this is the twenty-seventh time I have heard you relate this story, and you invariably said, a chesnut, until now.
See also: chestnut, old

pull someone's chestnuts out of the fire

succeed in a hazardous undertaking for someone else's benefit.
This expression refers to the fable of a monkey using a cat's paw (or in some versions a dog's paw) to rake out roasting chestnuts from a fire. Cat's paw is sometimes used as a term for someone who is used by another person as a tool or stooge.
See also: chestnut, fire, of, out, pull

an/that old ˈchestnut

(informal) a joke or story that has often been repeated and as a result is no longer amusing: ‘He told us all about the police arresting him for climbing into his own house.’ ‘Oh, no, not that old chestnut again.’
See also: chestnut, old, that
References in periodicals archive ?
Touching upon the policies for the development of this area, he noted that there is no particular state support for chestnut production.
Chestnut cultivation may be encouraged because it is a viable alternative for agricultural diversification.
In fact, the chestnut itself has a gene that is 79% similar to a peanut oxalate oxidase.
Chestnut logged his tenth win with the performance.
And if they ask how you prepared the chestnuts, you can tell them the story of the street children of Divisoria, who know instinctively how to crack open a chestnut.
The landowner was adamant about showing me what remained of the chestnut trees he'd planted only a year before.
Grown as early as 2,000 BC in North America, Europe and Asia, the chestnut is ingrained in the traditions of cultures around the world.
That tree was the American chestnut, Castanea dentata.
Before a fungal blight ((Cryphonectria parasitica)) effectively wiped out the American chestnut tree population in the eastern United States, there once were nutrient-rich American chestnut (Castanea dentata) trees supporting communities through food and industry, blanketing the landscape with all the prominence of large trees with broad crowns.
The American chestnut, which once thrived in the billions throughout the nation, was decimated in the last century by a blight that was accidentally introduced.
The American chestnut almost was wiped out in the 20th century.
This week, Urban Chestnut is preparing to move into the Chicago market.
That is because over the holidays, Wallace, proprietor of Chestnut Hill Tree Farm in Alachua, Fla.
Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited CEO Chris Kapches said that John Lusink has joined its senior management team as regional vice president.
This is the reason why many gluten-free foods contain chestnut.