cheque


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bogus check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of bogus checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: bogus, check

bad check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of bad checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: bad, check

bounced check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored because such funds are not available in the account in question. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. The bank notified me of several bounced checks that my husband has been writing around the country.
See also: bounce, check

cold check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of cold checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: check, cold

hot check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of hot checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: check, hot

rubber check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored because such funds are not available in the account in question. "Rubber" here is a play on the bouncing of a check. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. My ex-husband has been writing rubber checks all across the state.
See also: check, rubber

cheque is in the mail

Payment (whether or not in the form of a cheque) is en route or will be sent shortly. Often used as an excuse to avoid the pressure of creditors or someone expecting payment for goods or services. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. A: "Mr. Smith, your mortgage payment is now two months overdue." B: "The cheque's in the mail, I promise you!" A: "Can you lend me $40 until I get paid next week?" B: "Sure thing, the cheque's in the mail."
See also: cheque, mail

fake cheque

1. A written order to a bank that has been forged. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. A lot of fake cheques have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
2. A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. My ex-husband has been writing fake cheques all over town to pay for his gambling debt.
See also: cheque, fake

live paycheck to paycheck

To spend all of the money one earns by or before the next time one is paid, thus saving none or very little in the process. Primarily heard in US. We're already living paycheck to paycheck, so I don't know how we'll manage this sudden increase in our rent.
See also: live, paycheck

take a rain check

To refuse an offer or invitation but with the hope or promise that it can be postponed to a later date or time. I'm sorry, but I'll have to take a rain check for dinner this Saturday. Would next weekend work for you?
See also: check, rain, take

take a ride to Tyburn

obsolete To go to one's execution, especially by hanging. (From the Anglo-Saxon town of Tyburn, renowned for its practice of capital punishment.) The knave, found guilty of the theft of a loaf of bread, will be taking a ride to Tyburn in a fortnight's time.
See also: ride, take

a blank cheque

1. Literally, a cheque presented to someone with the amount left blank, so that it can be written out for the desired total. Mom, can you give me a blank cheque so I can fill it out when I buy my school supplies?
2. By extension, the freedom or permission to spend as much money or use as much resources as needed in pursuit of a desire or goal. The company was having a difficult time retaining good employees, so the manager was given a blank cheque to increase salaries and restructure his department. After the fifth murder, the city's police officers were given a blank cheque to use whatever resources they needed in order to find the serial killer before he struck again.
See also: blank, cheque

take a rain check

(on something) Go to a rain check (on something).
See also: check, rain, take

rubber check

A check drawn on an account without the funds to pay it, as in He's been handing out rubber checks right and left, but the police have caught up with him . The rubber alludes to the fact that, like rubber, the check "bounces," in this case back from the bank. [Slang; c. 1920]
See also: check, rubber

a blank cheque

COMMON
1. If you give someone a blank cheque to do something, you give them complete authority to do what they think is best in a difficult situation. Note: `Cheque' is spelled `check' in American English. De Klerk had, in a sense, been given a blank cheque to negotiate the new South Africa. The president was effectively given a blank check to commit the nation to war. Note: This expression is used mainly in talking about politics.
2. If you describe an amount of money as a blank cheque, you mean it is unlimited. Note: `Cheque' is spelled `check' in American English. We are not prepared to write a blank cheque for companies that have run into trouble through poor management. Note: This expression is sometimes used literally to mean that someone gives another person a cheque without an amount of money written on it.
See also: blank, cheque

take a rain check

INFORMAL
If you tell someone you will take a rain check, you are saying that you will not accept their offer now but that you might accept it at a different time. I'm sorry, Mimi, I'm just too exhausted to go out tonight. Could I take a rain check? She says she'd like to take a rain check on it and do it in May. Note: This expression refers to baseball. If a baseball game was cancelled because of rain, people were entitled to see another game by showing their original ticket or receipt. This ticket was called a rain check.
See also: check, rain, take

a blank cheque

unlimited scope, especially to spend money.
A blank cheque is literally one in which the amount of money to be paid has not been filled in by the payer.
See also: blank, cheque

take a rain check

said when politely refusing an offer, with the implication that you may take it up at a later date. North American
A rain check is a ticket given to spectators at US sporting events enabling them to claim a refund of their entrance money or gain admission on another occasion if the event is cancelled because of rain. The rain-check system is mentioned as operating in US sports grounds in the late 19th century; the figurative use of the word dates from the early 20th century.
See also: check, rain, take

rubber cheque

a cheque that is returned unpaid. informal humorous
The expression plays on the idea of a cheque that ‘bounces’, or is unpaid because there are insufficient funds in the drawer's account to cover it.
See also: cheque, rubber

a blank ˈcheque

(British English) (American English a blank ˈcheck) permission to act as you like (especially to spend money) in a particular task or situation: Just because I asked you to speak on my behalf, that didn’t mean you had a blank cheque to promise anything you liked.She was given a blank cheque and told to hire the best singers she could.
See also: blank, cheque

take a ˈrain check (on something)

(informal, especially American English) used to refuse an offer or invitation but to say that you will accept it later: ‘Would you like to try that new restaurant tonight?’ ‘I’m afraid I’m busy tonight, but can I take a rain check?’A rain check was originally a ticket that was given to spectators at an outdoor event if it was cancelled or interrupted by rain. They could then use this ticket at a future event.
See also: check, rain, take

hot check

n. a bad check. The crook got picked up after passing a hot check.
See also: check, hot

rubber (check)

n. a check that bounces; a forged check. (see also bounce.) The bank says I wrote a rubber check, but I’m sure there was enough money on deposit.
See also: check, rubber
References in periodicals archive ?
I had an agreement with the Russian before giving her the cheque aACA* her company was supposed to manage the charity project [hospital].
The accused told the judge the Indian was his partner in many businesses -- and there was no way he could have issued such a big cheque.
The Ordinance, which will amend the Negotiable Instruments Act, will enable filing of cases related to bounced cheques in the place where the cheque was presented for clearance or payment and not the place where it was issued.
With the CTS, banks will send only the digital image of cheques to the Port-Louis Automated Clearing House (PLACH), located at the Bank of Mauritius, for clearing.
NOBODY has a clue what might replace them, but cheques almost certainly moved a step closer to extinction this week amid angry accusations that high street banks want to kill them off to boost profits - and fatten their wretched bonuses.
She added: "Unfortunately, there were no Gaelic speakers at the Downpatrick branch when [this gentleman] visited and therefore his cheque was rejected.
But the committee, which held an inquiry into the issue last year, said it was unconvinced by the Payment Council's argument that cheques were "in terminal decline".
I believe is that signing a cheque will be a thing of the past within the next decade.
The closure of the system does not mean that people will no longer be able to use cheques, but that those cheques will no longer be guaranteed.
Once the cheque has gone, they are free to raise handling changes to retailers, who will pass them on to us.
The interface allows the user to type all the cheque elements including payee, date, amount, a/c payee only, bearer, and place of issues.
THE UK Payments Council has this week decided to phase out the use of cheques as a valid method of payment by 2018.
The cheque has been a widely-used payment method for the past 350 years, and although use is now in decline, four million cheques are still written every day in the UK.
Counsel Ahmed Al Dakhakhny of Saeed Al Barq for Advocacy and Legal Consultancy, told Khaleej Times one way some cases could be prevented was through banks limiting issuance of cheque books.
Cross-border cheques account for less than 1%of all cheque payments compared to approximately 10% of electronic cross border payments.