cheers


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Related to cheers: CHEARS

Bronx cheer

A sputtering noise made by pressing the tongue and lips together, used to express either real or faux contempt, mockery, or displeasure; a raspberry. Primarily heard in US. The fans collectively gave the opposing team a Bronx cheer when their relief pitcher walked onto the field.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer on

To support or encourage someone or something, often vocally. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cheer" and "on." I'm your mother—I'm going to cheer you on in anything you do! The whole town came out to cheer on the high school football team in the championship game.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

1. An imperative to improve one's mood, especially when sad or discouraged. Come on, the project was not a total failure—cheer up! Cheer up, honey—tomorrow's another day.
2. verb To induce one to become happier, especially when one is sad or discouraged. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cheer" and "up." I don't know how to cheer Paul up—he's been completely miserable since he found out he didn't get that job. Grandpa could always cheer up Sarah when she was sad about something.
See also: cheer, up

cheer someone or something on

to encourage someone or a group to continue to do well, as by cheering. We cheered them on, and they won. We cheered on the team. Sam cheered Jane on.
See also: cheer, on

cheer someone up

to make a sad person happy. When Bill was sick, Ann tried to cheer him up by reading to him. Interest rates went up, and that cheered up all the bankers.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up

[for a sad person] to become happy. After a while, she began to cheer up and smile more. Cheer up! Things could be worse.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up (somebody)

also cheer somebody up
to feel happier, or to cause someone to feel happier We've cheered up a lot since we found a great place to swim. Jack stopped at her apartment every day to bring her food and cheer her up.
See also: cheer, up

cheer on

Encourage, as in The crowd was cheering on all the marathon runners. Originating in the 1400s simply as cheer, this usage was augmented by on in the early 1800s.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

Become or make happy, raise the spirits of, as in This fine weather should cheer you up. This term may also be used as an imperative, as Shakespeare did ( 2 Henry IV, 4:4): "My sovereign lord, cheer up yourself." [Late 1500s]
See also: cheer, up

three cheers for

Good for, hurrah for, congratulations to, as in Three cheers for our mayor! Hip, hip, hooray! Why one should shout one's encouragement or approbation three times rather than two or four is unclear. A shouted cheer presumably originated as a nautical practice, if we are to believe Daniel Defoe in Captain Singleton (1720): "We gave them a cheer, as the seamen call it." Three cheers was first recorded in 1751. The term is also used sarcastically, when one is not really offering congratulations, as in So you finally passed; well, three cheers for you.
See also: cheers, three

cheer on

v.
To encourage someone with or as if with cheers: The spectators cheered the runners on as they passed by. I always cheer on the team that is losing.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

v.
1. To become happier or more cheerful: I cheered up once the weather got warmer.
2. To make someone happier or more cheerful: The fine spring day cheered me up. The hospital staged a musical to cheer up the sick patients.
See also: cheer, up

Bronx cheer

(ˈbrɑŋks ˈtʃir)
n. a rude noise made with the lips; a raspberry. The little air compressor in the corner of the parking lot made a noise like a Bronx cheer.
See also: Bronx, cheer

Bronx cheer

A raucous expression of displeasure. The sarcastic reference is to how spectators at sporting events in New York City's borough of the Bronx—at Yankee Stadium, for a notable example—let players on visiting teams, and umpires too, know what was on their mind. The classic “Bronx cheer” sound was produced by compressing the lips and blowing, which replicated the sound of passing wind. That noise was earlier called a raspberry (or raspberry tart, the British rhyming slang for “fart”), from which the word “razz” came.
See also: Bronx, cheer
References in classic literature ?
It therefore, in the first place, cheered Van Systens and his nosegay, then the corporation, then followed a cheer for the people; and, at last, and for once with great justice, there was one for the excellent music with which the gentlemen of the town councils generously treated the assemblage at every halt.
And the big boys who sit at the tables pound them and cheer; and the small boys who stand behind pound one another, and cheer, and rush about the hall cheering.
He sometimes turned to clap this friend upon the back, or whisper in his ear a word of staunch encouragement, or cheer him with a smile; but his great care was to shield him from the pressure, and force a passage for him to the Golden Key.
Most statistical tables are parchingly dry in the reading; not so in the present case, however, where the reader is flooded with whole pipes, barrels, quarts, and gills of good gin and good cheer.
Not for the last time," she said, and got a cheer, and we said good-bye all around, and faced eastward and rode away.
One more cheer for Cap'n Smollett," cried Long John when the first had subsided.
Then the child wondered no longer, but deeper grew her love for the tender-hearted Elves, who left their own happy home to cheer and comfort those who never knew what hands had clothed and fed them, what hearts had given of their own joy, and brought such happiness to theirs.
Long they stayed, and many a lesson little Eva learned: but when she begged them to go back, they still led her on, saying, "Our work is not yet done; shall we leave so many sad hearts when we may cheer them, so many dark homes that we may brighten?
They were very good to him, but not always particularly wise in their attempts to cheer and amuse; and Rose often found him much downcast after a visit of condolence from the Clan.
This made him rather low in his mind, and his cousins exerted themselves to cheer him up, especially one afternoon when a spasm of devotion seemed to seize them all.
Then they had to make way for Ozma to welcome the tin man, and the army caught sight of him and set up a cheer, and everybody was delighted and happy.
A long time she sat upon the stool (6) without speaking because of her sorrow, and greeted no one by word or by sign, but rested, never smiling, and tasting neither food nor drink, because she pined with longing for her deep-bosomed daughter, until careful Iambe -- who pleased her moods in aftertime also -- moved the holy lady with many a quip and jest to smile and laugh and cheer her heart.
434-437) So did they turn, with hearts at one, greatly cheer each the other's soul and spirit with many an embrace: their heart had relief from their griefs while each took and gave back joyousness.
As Nicholas and his sister were by this time compelled to superintend the removal of the few articles of furniture, Miss La Creevy devoted herself to the consolation of the matron, and observed with great kindness of manner that she must really make an effort, and cheer up.
No matter that it was utterly irreconcilable with the nature of things and course of events that the wretched honourable gentleman could possibly produce a Precedent for this--William Barnacle would nevertheless thank the honourable gentleman for that ironical cheer, and would close with him upon that issue, and would tell him to his teeth that there Was NO Precedent for this.