cheer

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Bronx cheer

A sputtering noise made by pressing the tongue and lips together, used to express either real or faux contempt, mockery, or displeasure; a raspberry. Primarily heard in US. The fans collectively gave the opposing team a Bronx cheer when their relief pitcher walked onto the field.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer for someone or something

to give a shout of encouragement for someone or something. Everyone cheered for the team. I cheered for the winning goal.
See also: cheer

cheer someone or something on

to encourage someone or a group to continue to do well, as by cheering. We cheered them on, and they won. We cheered on the team. Sam cheered Jane on.
See also: cheer, on

cheer someone up

to make a sad person happy. When Bill was sick, Ann tried to cheer him up by reading to him. Interest rates went up, and that cheered up all the bankers.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up

[for a sad person] to become happy. After a while, she began to cheer up and smile more. Cheer up! Things could be worse.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up (somebody)

also cheer somebody up
to feel happier, or to cause someone to feel happier We've cheered up a lot since we found a great place to swim. Jack stopped at her apartment every day to bring her food and cheer her up.
See also: cheer, up

a Bronx cheer

  (American informal)
a rude sound you make by holding your tongue between your lips and blowing Cindy turned around and blew a Bronx cheer at the kids who'd been teasing her.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer somebody to the echo

  (British old-fashioned)
to shout and clap a lot in order to support someone The team captain was cheered to the echo when he was presented with the cup.
See also: cheer, echo

cheer on

Encourage, as in The crowd was cheering on all the marathon runners. Originating in the 1400s simply as cheer, this usage was augmented by on in the early 1800s.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

Become or make happy, raise the spirits of, as in This fine weather should cheer you up. This term may also be used as an imperative, as Shakespeare did ( 2 Henry IV, 4:4): "My sovereign lord, cheer up yourself." [Late 1500s]
See also: cheer, up

cheer on

v.
To encourage someone with or as if with cheers: The spectators cheered the runners on as they passed by. I always cheer on the team that is losing.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

v.
1. To become happier or more cheerful: I cheered up once the weather got warmer.
2. To make someone happier or more cheerful: The fine spring day cheered me up. The hospital staged a musical to cheer up the sick patients.
See also: cheer, up

Bronx cheer

(ˈbrɑŋks ˈtʃir)
n. a rude noise made with the lips; a raspberry. The little air compressor in the corner of the parking lot made a noise like a Bronx cheer.
See also: Bronx, cheer

Bronx cheer

A raucous expression of displeasure. The sarcastic reference is to how spectators at sporting events in New York City's borough of the Bronx—at Yankee Stadium, for a notable example—let players on visiting teams, and umpires too, know what was on their mind. The classic “Bronx cheer” sound was produced by compressing the lips and blowing, which replicated the sound of passing wind. That noise was earlier called a raspberry (or raspberry tart, the British rhyming slang for “fart”), from which the word “razz” came.
See also: Bronx, cheer
References in periodicals archive ?
Trump responded, "There were people that were cheering on the other side of [the Hudson River in] New Jersey, where you have large Arab populations.
We were cheering, like we've cheered every new signing, because he's a good footballer who I hope can help the team back to the premiership.
By contrast, Quinnipiac didn't allow off-campus recruiting during the first year, didn't conduct a national search for a head coach, ended up turning its sideline cheering squad into the school's competitive cheer team and didn't provide a locker room for its squad.
BOYLSTON - Over the past two years, the Tahanto Regional High School cheerleading team has adopted a new way of cheering.
It was an incredible sight, everybody cheering him on.
At his own inauguration for a second six-year term a few days before Ahmadinejad's arrival, the Venezuelan leader described Jesus Christ as "the greatest socialist in all history" and screamed to a cheering crowd, "Fatherland
While the bill gives the Texas Education Agency authority to "punish" schools that allow such routines, the proposal doesn't specifically spell out what constitutes "suggestive" cheering.
delegations came forward and resumed cheering immediately after they marched off.
We've all had this experience: we walk into a room where someone else is watching sports on television, start watching the game and, even though we have no idea who is playing, end up cheering for one team rather than the other.
Television commercials and digital advertising featuring the inspiring stories of Team Visa athletes and memorable moments of Olympic legends underscore the role that cheering plays in helping athletes achieve greatness.
USA Cheer exists to serve the entire cheer community, including club cheering (All Star), traditional school based cheer programs and the new sport of STUNT.
His tailgating competitor, David Cruz, Citrus Park Bills Might Mites Dad (AKA - Grill Master) states, "2011 was my daughter's first year cheering with the Bills and I did not know what to expect.
There are three Clinton cheering squads heading to the regional competition at the Dunkin Donuts Center in Providence, R.
It combines gymnastics, tumbling, dancing, cheering, stunting.
Most of them know the study material, but because you have to answer the question with the crowd cheering around you, it adds to the mental strain.