cheer

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Bronx cheer

A sputtering noise made by pressing the tongue and lips together, used to express either real or faux contempt, mockery, or displeasure; a raspberry. Primarily heard in US. The fans collectively gave the opposing team a Bronx cheer when their relief pitcher walked onto the field.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer for someone or something

to give a shout of encouragement for someone or something. Everyone cheered for the team. I cheered for the winning goal.
See also: cheer

cheer someone or something on

to encourage someone or a group to continue to do well, as by cheering. We cheered them on, and they won. We cheered on the team. Sam cheered Jane on.
See also: cheer, on

cheer someone up

to make a sad person happy. When Bill was sick, Ann tried to cheer him up by reading to him. Interest rates went up, and that cheered up all the bankers.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up

[for a sad person] to become happy. After a while, she began to cheer up and smile more. Cheer up! Things could be worse.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up (somebody)

also cheer somebody up
to feel happier, or to cause someone to feel happier We've cheered up a lot since we found a great place to swim. Jack stopped at her apartment every day to bring her food and cheer her up.
See also: cheer, up

a Bronx cheer

  (American informal)
a rude sound you make by holding your tongue between your lips and blowing Cindy turned around and blew a Bronx cheer at the kids who'd been teasing her.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer somebody to the echo

  (British old-fashioned)
to shout and clap a lot in order to support someone The team captain was cheered to the echo when he was presented with the cup.
See also: cheer, echo

cheer on

Encourage, as in The crowd was cheering on all the marathon runners. Originating in the 1400s simply as cheer, this usage was augmented by on in the early 1800s.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

Become or make happy, raise the spirits of, as in This fine weather should cheer you up. This term may also be used as an imperative, as Shakespeare did ( 2 Henry IV, 4:4): "My sovereign lord, cheer up yourself." [Late 1500s]
See also: cheer, up

cheer on

v.
To encourage someone with or as if with cheers: The spectators cheered the runners on as they passed by. I always cheer on the team that is losing.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

v.
1. To become happier or more cheerful: I cheered up once the weather got warmer.
2. To make someone happier or more cheerful: The fine spring day cheered me up. The hospital staged a musical to cheer up the sick patients.
See also: cheer, up

Bronx cheer

(ˈbrɑŋks ˈtʃir)
n. a rude noise made with the lips; a raspberry. The little air compressor in the corner of the parking lot made a noise like a Bronx cheer.
See also: Bronx, cheer

Bronx cheer

A raucous expression of displeasure. The sarcastic reference is to how spectators at sporting events in New York City's borough of the Bronx—at Yankee Stadium, for a notable example—let players on visiting teams, and umpires too, know what was on their mind. The classic “Bronx cheer” sound was produced by compressing the lips and blowing, which replicated the sound of passing wind. That noise was earlier called a raspberry (or raspberry tart, the British rhyming slang for “fart”), from which the word “razz” came.
See also: Bronx, cheer
References in classic literature ?
These wonderful personages were not more heartily cheered by the people than were those who followed after them in the procession.
As the kind and generous friend of children mounted into the air the people all cheered at the top of their voices, for they loved Santa Claus dearly; and the little man heard them through the walls of his bubble and waved his hands in return as he smiled down upon them.
There first she landed from the fruitless upper air: and glad were the goddesses to see each other and cheered in heart.
Donald Trump has insisted in recent days that American Muslims gathered in the streets in New Jersey and cheered as the World Trade Center collapsed in September 2011.
Division 12, led by Head Coach Amy Faletra and assisted by Gail Flynn, Lisa Whitcomb and Jackie Fashjian, cheered their way to the top by defeating six other local teams.
IF Dave Mynard is 'disgusted' at the supporters who cheered Marlon King, (Telegraph, September 29) might I remind him that we weren't cheering in condonation of his "criminal past".
The children were cheered along the way by Birmingham-born Wayne Elcock, former British & WBU World Middleweight Champion.
You've come to cheer them up, but you walk out cheered up yourself,'' says the retired construction company manager.
His teammates cheered him on and yelled for him to run for the goal line.
I cheered for England and Scotland because that's where my relatives were from; France, because I speak French; and Croatia, because this is the first year that country was in the World Cup.
Thousands cheered the Queen as she took part in the Trooping the Colour ceremony to mark her official birthday yesterday.
They cheered for both the boys and girls basketball teams, which required them to cheer at two or three games a week.
EXCITED pupils ignored the school bell for lessons this morning - and cheered England into the last 16.
Separated by age groups, the children cheered enthusiastically as they were led by their coaches.
LANCASTER - Hundreds of Del Sur School pupils cheered as parent Biff Baker pedaled away on a 2,000-mile bicycle trek to the Canadian border.