cheek

(redirected from cheeked)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

with (one's) tongue in (one's) cheek

Humorously or as a joke, though seeming or appearing to be serious. The president gave a speech on April Fools' Day about the "War on Couch Potatoes," which he delivered with his tongue in his cheek. The zombie movie, very much with its tongue in its cheek, gives a clever criticism of American consumerism.
See also: cheek, tongue

tongue-in-cheek

Jocular or humorous, though seeming or appearing to be serious. The president's tongue-in-cheek speech about the "War on Couch Potatoes" has been extremely popular on the Internet this week.

cheek by jowl

Fig. side by side; close together. The pedestrians had to walk cheek by jowl along the narrow streets. The two families lived cheek by jowl in one house.
See also: cheek

tongue-in-cheek

Fig. insincere; joking. Ann made a tongue-in-cheek remark to John, and he got mad because he thought she was serious. The play seemed very serious at first, but then everyone saw that it was tongue-in-cheek, and they began laughing.

turn the other cheek

Fig. to ignore abuse or an insult. When Bob got mad at Mary and yelled at her, she just turned the other cheek. Usually I turn the other cheek when someone is rude to me.
See also: cheek, other, turn

cheek by jowl

very close together Business and residential buildings have been developed cheek by jowl in this city.
Etymology: based on the idea that the cheek and jowl (parts of the face) are very close to each other
See also: cheek

turn the other cheek

to decide not to do anything to hurt someone who has hurt you When someone attacks you personally, the best approach may be to turn the other cheek.
Etymology: based on the Biblical instruction to turn the other cheek (if someone hits you, a better response than hitting them is to turn your face so that they can hit you on the other side)
See also: cheek, other, turn

(with) tongue in cheek

in a way that is not serious, although it appears to be Karl explained, tongue in cheek, that he was busy with housecleaning.
See also: cheek, tongue

cheek by jowl

very close together
Usage notes: Jowl is a word for the loose flesh by the lower jaw, which is very close to the cheek.
The poor lived cheek by jowl in industrial mining towns in Victorian England.
See also: cheek

put the roses in somebody's cheeks

  also bring the roses to somebody's cheeks
to make someone look healthy A brisk walk will soon put the roses back in your cheeks.
See come out smelling of roses
See also: cheek, put, rose

tongue in cheek

  also with your tongue in your cheek
if you say something tongue in cheek, what you have said is a joke, although it might seem to be serious 'And we all know what a passionate love life I have!' he said, tongue in cheek.
See bite tongue, find tongue, hold tongue, loosen tongue
See also: cheek, tongue

turn the other cheek

if you turn the other cheek when someone attacks or insults you, you do not get angry and attack or insult them but stay calm instead Neither nation is renowned for turning the other cheek.
See also: cheek, other, turn

cheek by jowl

Side by side, close together, as in In that crowded subway car we stood cheek by jowl, virtually holding one another up. This term dates from the 16th century, when it replaced cheek by cheek.
See also: cheek

tongue in cheek, with

Ironically or as a joke, as in Was he speaking with tongue in cheek when he said Sally should run for president? This term probably alludes to the facial expression produced by poking one's tongue in one's cheek, perhaps to suppress a smile. [First half of 1800s]
See also: tongue

turn the other cheek

Respond meekly or mildly to insult or injury without retaliating. For example, There's no point in arguing with that unreasonable supervisor; just turn the other cheek . This expression comes from the New Testament, in which Jesus tells his followers to love their enemies and offer their other cheek to those who have struck one cheek (Luke 6:29).
See also: cheek, other, turn

tongue in cheek

and TIC
phr. & comp. abb. a phrase said when the speaker is joking or not being sincere. My comment was made TIC. Don’t take me seriously.
See also: cheek, tongue

water one’s cheeks

tv. to cry; to shed tears sobbing. Poor Billy was watering his cheeks all night because his dog ran away.
See also: cheek, water

cheek by jowl

Side by side; close together.
See also: cheek