checked


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Related to checked: cracked

spot check

1. noun An inspection that is random and/or occurs only for a limited time. Because I've gotten reports that some of you are abandoning your posts early, there will be spot checks for the foreseeable future.
2. verb To make such an inspection. Because I've gotten reports that some of you are abandoning your posts early, I will be spot checking you all for the foreseeable future.
See also: check, spot

check in

1. To officially confirm one's arrival at a certain place where one is expected, such as a hotel. I'll go check in at the front desk and get our room key. Tara is checking in for the exam at the registration table. The librarian already checked those books in.
2. To officially record someone's or something's arrival at a certain place. In this usage, a noun can be used between "check" and "in." Sir, I can check you in over here. We need to check in all these students before they're given the test materials. Hey, check in with your mother once in a while when you're away at college, will you?
3. To communicate with someone at a certain interval in time so as to provide or ask about an update in status or otherwise simply talk. Hi mom, I'm just checking in to see if you're feeling any better. Has anyone checked in with the publisher? When will the next issue be finished?
4. To die. That rickety old car will definitely check in before you make it to the mechanic.
See also: check

check back

To ask about someone or something again later; follow up. I don't have an update on that shipment right now, but check back later.
See also: back, check

check (one's) bags through (to) (some place)

To request that one's luggage be sent to one's final destination, as when traveling through multiple cities or via different modes of transportation. I don't have any luggage with me because I checked my bags through to Rome. Just check your bags through, and then you don't have to worry about keeping track of them at every stop.
See also: bag, check, through

check into

1. To officially confirm one's arrival at a certain place where one is expected, such as a hotel. I'll check into the hotel and get our room key. Where do we check into the conference?
2. To voluntarily seek medical care at the hospital (as opposed to being rushed there by ambulance). In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used between "check" and "into." I'm glad I checked myself into the hospital because the pain turned out to be appendicitis!
3. To officially record someone's or something's arrival at a certain place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "check" and "into." Sir, I can check you into the hotel over here. Can you check these books into the system?
4. To investigate something. Please check into these discrepancies in the budget, and let me know what you find out. Don't worry, I checked you off when I took attendance.
See also: check

check off

To mark someone or something as present, verified, or completed, as on a list. A noun or pronoun can be used between "check" and "off." Checking things off my to-do list is so satisfying. Please check off each step as you do it. Can you check on the dryer and tell me if it's still running?
See also: check, off

check out

1. verb To confirm that one has vacated one's hotel room (and pay the bill). We have to check out in an hour, so you guys seriously need to start packing! Check out George over there. That dude knows how to dress!
2. verb To investigate, inspect, or look at something of interest. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." We checked out that house on the corner, but the price was too high considering all the work it needs. Wow, check this out—someone in the next town over won the lottery last week!
3. verb To be verified as true, accurate, or meeting a certain standard. Surprisingly, her story checks out—she really was at the library until midnight last night.
4. verb To become unfocused or distracted; to cease participating in a meaningful way. Well, he's still blabbing away, but I couldn't tell you what he's talking about now—I checked out a while ago. I know Jim is retiring at the end of June, but he's already checked out if you ask me.
5. verb To complete a purchase by providing payment at the final point of sale, as in a retail store. I'm checking out right now, so I'll be out to the car in a minute. I'm about to check out—is there anything else you needed from the store?
6. verb To tally one's purchases and take payment for them. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." The cashier is checking me out right now, so I'll be out to the car in a minute. Please check out these customers while I see if we have any more of those items in the back.
7. verb To complete the necessary steps so that one can borrow something from a system, such as a library. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." What books did you check out from the library this week? Can I check these books out, or are they reference only?
8. verb, slang To look with interest at someone who one finds attractive. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." That cute guy over there is totally checking you out!
9. verb, slang To die. Doctor, I'm not ready to check out yet, so I'm willing to try your most aggressive approach.
10. noun The time at which one must vacate one's hotel room. When used as a noun, the phrase is often written as one word. Checkout is at 11 AM, so you guys need to start packing now!
11. noun The area of a store at which purchases are made. When used as a noun, the phrase is often written as one word. I'm at the checkout right now, so I hope there isn't anything else you need from the store.
See also: check, out

check out the plumbing

euphemism To urinate or defecate; to go the bathroom. I'll be right back—I just have to check out the plumbing.
See also: check, out, plumbing

check over

To examine or assess someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "check" and "over." Don't move until the paramedics check you over. While the students were busy taking the test, I checked over their homework.
See also: check

check through

1. To inspect or examine one or more things. Check through the fridge and tell me if we have any of the ingredients for this recipe. I checked through the entire file but I didn't see that document in there.
2. To grant one entrance to a particular place, area, or event after verifying one's credentials (such as an admission ticket or official paperwork). In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "check" and "through." We have tickets to the show right here, so why can't you just check us through?
3. To request that one's luggage be sent to one's final destination, as when traveling through multiple cities or via different modes of transportation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "check" and "through." I don't have any luggage with me because I checked my bags through to Rome.
4. To allow to travel through multiple cities without requiring one to show one's ticket at each stop. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "check" and "through." You don't need to be in this line, ma'am, since you've already been checked through. Can you check up on the dryer and tell me if it's still running?
See also: check, through

check up

1. verb To check the status, condition, or wellbeing of someone or something through an inspection or visit. We need to check up on grandma and see how she is coping with all this snow. I just checked up on the baby, and he's still sleeping.
2. noun A visit to a doctor for an examination, often as part of routine monitoring (rather than for an acute condition or reason). In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated. Oh, it's just my yearly check-up, nothing to worry about. Can you check up on the dryer and tell me if it's still running?
See also: check, up

check up on (someone or something)

1. To check the status, condition, or wellbeing of someone or something through an inspection or visit. We need to check up on grandma and see how she is coping with all this snow. I just checked up on the baby, and he's still sleeping.
2. To monitor what one is doing, especially when such attention is unwelcome or irritating to the one being monitored. Well, this work would go a lot faster if you quit checking up on me every five minutes!
See also: check, on, up

check with (someone or something)

1. To consult or confer with someone about something. I'm the lead person on this campaign, so please check with me before making any big decisions. Check with Harold if you have any questions about this case.
2. To match or agree with something. Run this test again and see if the results check with the ones from yesterday.
See also: check

check back

(on someone or something) to look into the state of someone or something again at a later time. I'll have to check back on you later.
See also: back, check

check back (with someone)

to inquire of someone again at a later time. Please check back with me later.
See also: back, check

check in

(at something) to go to a place to record one's arrival. When you get there, check in at the front office.
See also: check

check in

(on someone or something) Go to look in (on someone or something).
See also: check

check in

(with someone) to go to someone and indicate that one has arrived some place. Please check in with the desk clerk.
See also: check

check in

 (to something)
1. to sign oneself into a place to stay, such as a hotel, hospital, motel, etc. She checked into a private hospital for some kind of treatment. They checked into the first motel they came to on the highway.
2. Go to look into something.
See also: check

check out

[for someone or something] to prove to be correctly represented. Everything you told me checks out with what other witnesses said.
See also: check, out

check out (of something)

 and check out (from something)
to do whatever is necessary to leave a place and then depart, (check out (of something) is more frequent.) I will check out of the hotel at about noon. I will check out from the office and come right to where you are.
See also: check, out

check out the plumbing

Euph. to go to the bathroom. (The order is fixed.) I think I'd better check out the plumbing before we get on the highway.
See also: check, out, plumbing

check someone in

to record the arrival of someone. Ask the guard to check you in when you get there. Tell the guard to check in the visitors as they arrive.
See also: check

check someone or something off

to mark or cross out the name of a person or thing on a list. I am glad to see that you were able to come. I will check you off. I checked the items off. I checked off the recent arrivals.
See also: check, off

check someone or something out

to evaluate someone or something. That stock sounds good. I'll check it out. I'll check out the competition.
See also: check, out

check someone or something out (of something)

to do the paperwork necessary to remove someone or something from something or some place. I will have the manager check you out of the hotel and send you the bill. The librarian checked out the computer to me.
See also: check, out

check someone or something over

to examine someone or something closely. You should have the doctor check you over before you go back to work. The doctor checked over the children who had shown the worst symptoms. The mechanic checked the car over.
See also: check

check someone or something through (something)

to allow one to pass through something after checking one's identification, tickets, passes, etc. (Fixed order.) The guard checked us through the gate, and we went about our business. We checked them through security.
See also: check, through

check something in

 
1. to record that someone has returned something. I asked the librarian to check the book in for me. Did the librarian check in the book?
2. to take something to a place, return it, and make sure that its return has been recorded. I checked the book in on time. Did you really check in the book on time?
3. to examine a shipment or an order received and make certain that everything ordered was received. I checked the order in and sent a report to the manager. Tim checked in the order from the supplier to make sure that everything was there.
See also: check

check something out

to examine or try something; to think about something. It's something we all have to be concerned with. Check it out. Check out the new comedy show on tonight.
See also: check, out

check through something

to examine something or a collection of things. (Usually refers to papers or written work, or to details in the paperwork.) Check through this and look for missing pages. I'll check through it for typographical errors also.
See also: check, through

check up (on someone or something)

to determine the state of someone or something. Please don't check up on me. I can be trusted. I see no need to check up.
See also: check, up

check in

1. Record one's arrival at a hotel, conference, or other function, as in I asked the hotel if we could check in early. [Early 1900s] Also see check into, def. 2.
2. Die, as in With the plane rapidly losing fuel, the pilot was sure he'd check in. [Slang; early 1900s] Also see check out.
See also: check

check into

1. Investigate something, as in I don't know when they open but I'll check into it. Also see check out.
2. Register one's arrival at, as in She was about to check into the hospital. Also see check in, def. 1.
See also: check

check off

Mark as entered, or examined and passed, as in He checked off their names as they arrived. [Early 1800s]
See also: check, off

check out

1. Record one's departure from a hotel by paying the bill, or from a conference or other function, as in As soon as my bags are packed I'll check out of the motel. [Early 1900s]
2. Leave hurriedly, make a quick exit, as in The minute I get paid I'm checking out. [Slang; 1920s]
3. Die, as in When he got cholera, he was sure he'd check out. [Slang; 1920s]
4. Withdraw an item after recording the withdrawal, as in I'll check out the tapes on your library card. [1930s]
5. Record, total the prices, and receive payment for a purchase, as in The cashier checked out and bagged my groceries in record time.
6. check something or someone out . Investigate or evaluate something or someone; observe carefully. For example, I don't know if you'll like the film; check it out yourself, or That man who's staring is probably just checking us out. [Slang; mid-1900s]
7. Pass close inspection, as in That rattle made me suspicious, but the repairman said the machine checked out completely.
See also: check, out

check up

see under check on.
See also: check, up

check in

v.
1. To register or record one's arrival somewhere, as at a hotel or airport: The airline requires you to check in at least an hour before your flight. I entered the hotel, went to the registration desk, and checked in.
2. To register or record the arrival of someone, as at a hotel or airport: The hotel receptionist checked us in and gave us the key to our room. The ticket agent checked in the passengers and gave them their boarding passes.
3. To return or deposit something somewhere, and have its receipt recorded: I checked the book in to the library a few days late. When we arrived at the airport, we checked in our luggage and proceeded to the plane.
4. To record that something has been returned or deposited somewhere: The librarian checked in the stack of books that people had returned. The porter checked our bags in for the flight.
See also: check

check into

v.
1. To investigate something; look into something: I checked into the rumor that the band was going on tour, and the rumor turned out to be false.
2. To register and gain admittance to one's room upon arrival at a hotel or other place of lodging: When I arrived in New York, I checked into the hotel and went straight to bed.
See also: check

check off

v.
To put a check mark on or next to some item on a list to indicate that it has been reviewed or completed: Don't forget to check off the task after you have completed it. As I put the groceries in the cart, I checked them off on my list.
See also: check, off

check out

v.
1. To inspect something so as to determine accuracy, quality, or other condition; test something: The technician checked out the computer system to make sure there were no errors in the software. I heard a strange noise, so I went downstairs to check it out.
2. To be verified or confirmed; pass inspection: Although we doubted it at first, the suspect's story checked out.
3. To look at someone or something that is surprising, interesting, or attractive: If you liked that movie, you should check out the director's other films. Check out the size of that diamond! I became jealous when I saw my spouse checking the lifeguard out.
4. To settle one's bill and leave a hotel or other place of lodging: The hotel requires that guests check out by noon so that the rooms can be cleaned before the next guests arrive.
5. To record and sum the prices of and receive payment for something being purchased or the items someone is purchasing at a retail store: The cashier checked out and bagged my order. We brought our items to the counter, and the sales clerk checked us out.
6. To undergo the process of purchasing some selected item or items from a retailer: It took us an hour to check out because there was only one register.
7. To borrow some item, as from a library, with the lender registering or keeping track of the borrowing: I checked out all four volumes, but could only read the first before they were due. If you don't finish that book before the library closes, you will have to check it out. I went to the video store and checked out two movies.
8. To lose awareness of one's surroundings; become inattentive: I got bored at the meeting and checked out until someone punched me on the arm.
9. Slang To die: When I check out, I want to be buried in a fancy coffin.
See also: check, out

check over

v.
To examine something or someone closely: I checked over the bill to make sure it was accurate. The teacher checked the students' papers over for errors.
See also: check

check through

v.
1. To examine something or a group of things: I checked through the drawer to see if I had left my keys there.
2. To allow someone to pass through some place after examining tickets, papers, or passes: The security guards checked us through the gate.
3. To have someone's travel be arranged so that the traveller may present a ticket or check in only at the beginning of a journey and not at each leg: You don't need to go to the ticket counter when you change planes; we already checked you through.
4. To have something, especially luggage, sent along each leg of a journey to some destination, without requiring that a person pick it up and check it again at each leg of the journey, as when changing airplanes, trains, or buses: You should check your luggage through, or else you'll have to carry your bags with you in the airport.
See also: check, through

check out the plumbing

and visit the plumbing
tv. to go to the bathroom. I think I’d better check out the plumbing before we go. Excuse me. I need to visit the plumbing.
See also: check, out, plumbing
References in classic literature ?
Perkins checked her with a gentle motion of his hand.
She looked at him, and checked herself again; resolute to make her terrible confession, yet still hesitating how to begin.
He sprung from his seat and checked her, holding her with both his hands, raising her as he rose himself.
in our fields, because the seeds are in great excess compared with the number of birds which feed on them; nor can the birds, though having a superabundance of food at this one season, increase in number proportionally to the supply of seed, as their numbers are checked during winter: but any one who has tried, knows how troublesome it is to get seed from a few wheat or other such plants in a garden; I have in this case lost every single seed.
increase in numbers is obviously impossible, and must be checked by some means.
Wilson was busy in the kitchen, but the room was not empty; and I scarcely checked an involuntary recoil as I entered it; for there sat Miss Wilson chattering with Eliza Millward.
This repetition checked the rising up of fresh images and memories, which he felt were thronging in his brain.
The Duchess left on Friday, and we checked her baggage through to Lenox by the New York, New Haven & Hartford.