cheat at (something)

(redirected from cheating at)

cheat at (something)

To act deceptively or unfairly while completing a task or participating in a competition. My little brother cheats at every board game, so it's not much fun to play with him.
See also: cheat

cheat at something

to use deception while competing [against someone]. They say she cheats at cards. The mob is likely to cheat at getting the contracts.
See also: cheat
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sorry Not Sorry Cheaters, meanwhile, do not feel guilty about cheating at all.
2 was media reports a few weeks earlier about exam cheating at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana.
An analysis of the data revealed that faculty is uncertain about the extent of cheating at their college, but most take action once they discover an instance of cheating.
If the current cheating rate were not 47%, but 70%, then even in that extreme case the probability of cheating at least once in five exams is 18,3%.
McCabe, Trevino and Butterfield (2001, 2003) found a lower proportion of cheating at universities with a code of ethics and that at universities where the lecturers are obligated by a code of ethics they will more closely supervise exams and put more effort into preventing cheating.
McCabe, Trevino and Butterfield (2001) further the research on honor codes by finding that there is additional peer reporting of cheating at schools with traditional honor codes.
A student takes a Boos Fee Wara'tak questionnaire about cheating at Cairo University.
Kidwell and Wozniak (2003) surveyed students about cheating at a small liberal arts college and found that over 70 percent of those surveyed reported cheating, plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty; many reported multiple violations.
Sahami pleaded guilty at Southwark Crown Court to three counts of fraud, three of cheating at gambling, and two of theft, a spokesman said.
Each of the 'Dark Triad' variables went hand in hand with cheating at a high level of statistical significance.
But, the newspaper reported, the state's follow-up amounted to asking school officials whether there might be cheating at their schools.
Educators such as Puka (2005) lay some of the responsibility for student cheating at the feet of the classroom instructors.
National polls have found that about three-quarters of college students confess to cheating at least once.
Those surveyed admitted cheating at least once in the last year--on tests or by copying material without citing the source, reports Rutgers University Management Professor Donald McCabe, who conducted the survey.
The majority admitted cheating at some point themselves.