cheap

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cheap at twice the price

Remarkably or exceedingly inexpensive (as in, even if you doubled the price, it would still be a good value). Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I got a brand new three-piece suit for 50 bucks—cheap at twice the price!
See also: cheap, price, twice

cheap Charlie

A derogatory term for a miserly or parsimonious person. Used largely in countries of Southeast Asia, it likely originated in Vietnam during the Vietnam War to refer to American GIs (who called soldiers of the Viet Cong "Charlie") unwilling to spend extravagantly at bars, restaurants, or for prostitutes. Buy us a round of drinks, don't be a cheap Charlie!
See also: Charlie, cheap

cheap-arse Tuesday

The day of the week in Australia when many goods and services are offered at lower prices or as part of discounted deals. Primarily heard in Australia. When I was studying in university, cheap-arse Tuesday was my favorite day of the week!
See also: Tuesday

buy cheap, buy twice

If something is inexpensive, it is probably poorly made or will wear out quickly (and one will have to purchase it again). A: "I need to save some money, so I think I'm just going to buy this cheap cell phone." B: "I'd be wary if I were you. You'll probably end up spending more money—buy cheap, buy twice, and all that."
See also: buy, twice

cheap shot

1. A physical blow struck against someone who is unready or unprepared. If often applies to sports in which physical contact is involved. Duane just sucker-punched Jimbo. What a cheap shot! The boxer took a cheap shot against his opponent before the round started, and the referee halted the match.
2. A mean or unfair criticism. I didn't appreciate that cheap shot you took at me at the party. You made me look foolish in front of our friends.
See also: cheap, shot

cheap and cheerful

slang Inexpensive and enjoyable or pleasant. Primarily heard in UK. That shop sells a lot of cheap and cheerful goodies, so I'm sure you'll be able to find a birthday gift for her there.
See also: and, cheap

cheap and nasty

Inexpensive and poorly constructed. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Don't buy anything from that shop unless you're OK with it breaking—everything they sell is cheap and nasty.
See also: and, cheap, nasty

cheap at half the price

1. Remarkably or exceedingly inexpensive. The phrase's origin in this usage has been debated; it is possibly a corruption of "cheap at twice the price," meaning the same. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I got a brand new three-piece suit for £50—cheap at half the price!
2. Quite expensive; poor value for the money. In this usage, it is likely a humorous play on the phrase "cheap at twice the price," meaning remarkably inexpensive. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. A: "Wow, I'd love to own that car." B: "Sure, so would I. Cheap at half the price, though!"
See also: cheap, half, price

dirt cheap

Very inexpensive These shoes were dirt cheap—I found them on the clearance rack.
See also: cheap, dirt

life is cheap

Life carries no special significance and has little inherent value, so it doesn't matter when someone dies. Unfortunately, in this part of the world, life is cheap in the eyes of the government.
See also: cheap, life

pile it/them high and sell it/them cheap

To sell large quantities of something at heavily discounted prices. Primarily heard in UK. As a small, independent book shop, it's hard to compete with the massive chains that can afford to pile them high and sell them cheap. I'd be wary of any electronic devices you buy from shops that pile it high and sell it cheap.
See also: and, cheap, high, pile, sell

on the cheap

For a low price or at very little cost; inexpensively. You want new carpets? My brother-in-law can get them on the cheap from a friend of his. The store is selling all of its merchandise on the cheap as part of its liquidation sale. If you're savvy, you can travel just about anywhere in the world on the cheap.
See also: cheap, on

dirt cheap

extremely cheap. Buy some more of those plums. They're dirt cheap, In Italy, the peaches are dirt cheap.
See also: cheap, dirt

Talk is cheap.

Prov. It is easier to say you will do something than to actually do it. (Saying this in response to someone who promises you something implies that you do not believe that person will keep the promise.) My boss keeps saying she'll give me a raise, but talk is cheap. You've been promising me a new dishwasher for five years now. Talk is cheap.
See also: cheap, talk

Why buy a cow when you can get milk for free?

 and Why buy a cow when milk is so cheap?
Prov. Why pay for something that you can get for free otherwise. (Sometimes used to describe someone who will not marry because sex without any commitment is so easy to obtain. Jocular and crude.) I don't have a car because someone always gives me a ride to work. Why buy a cow when you can get milk for free? Mary told her daughter, "You may think that boy will marry you because you're willing to sleep with him, but why should he buy a cow if he can get milk for free?"
See also: buy, can, cow, get, milk, why

cheap at twice the price

Very inexpensive, a good value for the money. For example, Pete got a $3,000 rebate on his new car-it was cheap at twice the price. For a synonym see dirt cheap.
See also: cheap, price, twice

cheap shot

An unfair or unsporting verbal attack, as in You called him an amateur? That's really taking a cheap shot. The term originated in sports, especially American football, where it signifies deliberate roughness against an unprepared opponent. [Slang; second half of 1900s]
See also: cheap, shot

cheap skate

A stingy person, as in He's a real cheap skate when it comes to tipping. This idiom combines cheap (for "penurious") with the slang usage of skate for a contemptible or low individual. It has largely replaced the earlier cheap John. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: cheap, skate

dirt cheap

Very inexpensive, as in Their house was a real bargain, dirt cheap. Although the idea dates back to ancient times, the precise expression, literally meaning "as cheap as dirt," replaced the now obsolete dog cheap. [Early 1800s]
See also: cheap, dirt

on the cheap

Economically, at very little cost, as in We're traveling around Europe on the cheap. [Colloquial; mid-1800s]
See also: cheap, on

a cheap shot

If you describe something critical that someone says as a cheap shot, you mean that it is unfair or unpleasant. It would be a cheap shot, of course, to say anything about his hair. The cartoon is a cheap shot that will draw a guilty chuckle from even the most sensitive reader.
See also: cheap, shot

cheap and cheerful

simple and inexpensive. British
See also: and, cheap

cheap and nasty

of low cost and bad quality. British
See also: and, cheap, nasty

cheap as chips

extremely inexpensive. British informal
2003 Croydon Guardian Sutton Arena is ‘cheap as chips’, with athletics sessions costing as little as 80p, according to the borough's leisure boss.
See also: cheap, chip

cheap at the price

well worth having, regardless of the cost.
A frequently heard variant of this expression, cheap at half the price , while used to mean exactly the same, is, logically speaking, nonsense, since cheap at twice the price is the actual meaning intended.
See also: cheap, price

be going ˈcheap

(informal) be sold at a low price: These shirts were going cheap, so I bought two.
See also: cheap, going

cheap and ˈcheerful

(informal) something that is cheap and cheerful does not cost a lot but is attractive and pleasant: cheap and cheerful clothes/meals/rugs
See also: and, cheap

cheap and ˈnasty

(informal) something that is cheap and nasty does not cost a lot and is of poor quality and not very attractive or pleasant: The furniture was cheap and nasty.
See also: and, cheap, nasty

cheap at the ˈprice

(British English) (American English cheap at ˈtwice the price) worth more than the price paid, even though it is expensive: I know £6 000 is a lot of money, but a great car like this is cheap at the price.
See also: cheap, price

not come ˈcheap

be expensive: Violins like this don’t come cheap.Babies certainly don’t come cheap (= it is expensive to buy everything they need).
See also: cheap, come, not

on the ˈcheap

(informal) for less than the normal cost (and therefore of poor quality): He got it on the cheap so I wasn’t surprised when it broke after a couple of months.
See also: cheap, on

life is ˈcheap

(disapproving) used to say that there is a situation in which it is not thought to be important if people somewhere die or are treated badly: In areas like this, drugs are hard currency and life is cheap.
See also: cheap, life

all over someone like a cheap suit

phr. pawing and clinging; seductive. (A cheap suit might cling to its wearer.) She must have liked him. She was all over him like a cheap suit.
See also: all, cheap, like, over, suit

cheap shot

n. a remark that takes advantage of someone else’s vulnerability. It’s easy to get a laugh with a cheap shot at cats.
See also: cheap, shot

dirt cheap

mod. very cheap. Get one of these while they’re dirt cheap.
See also: cheap, dirt

cheap at twice the price

Extremely inexpensive.
See also: cheap, price, twice

on the cheap

By inexpensive means; cheaply: traveled to Europe on the cheap.
See also: cheap, on

fold like a cheap suitcase

Collapse easily. Expensive luggage was made, as now, from well-constructed leather or fabric. Cheap ones used to be made of cardboard with little or no structural reinforcement, not very sturdy especially when manhandled by baggage handlers or hotel porters. A sports team with no defense or a poker player with a losing hand would both fold like a cheap suitcase. You'd also hear “fold like a cheap suit,” but since fabric folds easily, whether it's cashmere or polyester, “suitcase” presents a better connotation of a losing proposition.
See also: cheap, fold, like, suitcase
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike most carabiners which are cheaply made from aluminum and other poor quality components, the stainless steel Link carabiners are incredibly durable.
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e Business Secretary has always rejected claims that the Government sold o Royal Mail too cheaply.
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One way to bring in exclusive stories cheaply was to listen to someone's voicemails and worK out who they were having a relationship with, he said.
We were giving them the ball so cheaply they were then hitting us on the break,'' he said.
Mrs Hodge said: "Customers should be able to contact those services easily and cheaply.
The German finance minister has said that the country does not support the government's stake in Commerzbank being sold cheaply to Banco Santander (SAN.
Vast supermarket chains and food processors work hard to produce food as cheaply as possible.
It was a] very good day for England, taking four wickets quickly and cheaply this morning was important obviously," said Swann, who took three wickets for four runs in six overs before lunch.
Ian Bell (8) and Paul Collingwood (9) fell cheaply but the in-form Trott responded with a typically hard-working 50.
Summary: The Egyptian media has repeatedly accused the government of selling national assets too cheaply.
It will allow researchers to produce the IFN gamma protein more abundantly and cheaply.
A change in European law means home chefs could soon be able to make fruit pies or cakes more cheaply.