chalk

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by a long chalk

By a wide margin, as of time, distance, ability, etc. Often used in the negative to indicate not at all or by no means. Primarily heard in UK. He won that match by a long chalk. I'm not done yet, not by a long chalk!
See also: chalk, long

not by a long chalk

Not at all; not by great or any means. Primarily heard in UK. I'm not beaten yet, not by a long chalk!
See also: chalk, long, not

chalk off

1. In sports, to disallow a goal due to a technical rule of the game. Primarily heard in UK. Their last-minute goal would have won the match, but it was chalked off due to an offsides ruling by the referee.
2. To record, mark, or make note of something, especially as having been completed. I always find it bittersweet to chalk off another birthday each year.
3. To delineate the border of something with chalk. You always see the police chalk off bodies of murder victims in movies. I wonder if they do that in real life.
See also: chalk, off

chalk (something or someone) off

To presume, dismiss, or disregard someone or something as being a certain way. I really liked his earlier music, but I've chalked him off as a total sellout in recent years. Most people chalked the film off as yet another brainless horror movie.
See also: chalk, off

chalk (something) up to experience

To regard a bad situation, action, or outcome as a learning experience rather than dwelling on its negative impact. I know you're upset about failing your exam, but just chalk it up to experience and try harder next time!
See also: chalk, experience, up

chalk it up

To link something that has happened to a particular reason or circumstance. Don't get too down on yourselves after this loss, boys. Let's just chalk it up to inexperience and move on. Sure, getting a B in Algebra is disappointing, but I'm just going to chalk it up to the fact that I'm usually terrible at math!
See also: chalk, up

know chalk from cheese

To be able to tell two things apart (especially by recognizing their differences). Of course I know which twin is which, I know chalk from cheese, after all! Leah has a beauty mark under her left eye, and Deena doesn't.
See also: chalk, cheese, know

make chalk of one and cheese of the other

To favor one person or thing over another. In this phrase, "chalk" is something worthless, while "cheese" is something valuable. I can't stand how unfairly you treat your sons—stop making chalk of one and cheese of the other!
See also: and, chalk, cheese, make, of, one, other

walk the chalk

To show one's competence in a particular area. This outdated phrase refers to a sobriety test in which one had to walk between chalk lines. I was so worried that I wouldn't be able to walk the chalk, but I got a perfect score on my exam!
See also: chalk, walk

at the chalkface

In the act of teaching. Because she's a new teacher, she still gets very nervous while at the chalkface. All of my students failed the test, despite the many hours I spent at the chalkface on that subject.

be chalk and cheese

To be very different from one another. Good luck getting those two to talk to each other—they're like chalk and cheese. My daughters are chalk and cheese these days—one loves baseball and the other loves ballet.
See also: and, chalk, cheese

chalk out

1. To illustrate something, often a plan or concept, by literally drawing it in chalk. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "out." The architect quickly chalked out her vision for the addition to our house, to gauge our initial reactions to it.
2. To explain something to someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "out." I still don't understand your idea. Can you start over and chalk it all out for me?
See also: chalk, out

chalk up

1. Literally, to write something in chalk, as on a chalkboard. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "up." Once I finish chalking up tonight's homework assignment, we can discuss last night's reading.
2. To earn something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "up." After you chalk up enough frequent flier miles, you will be able to get plane tickets for free.
3. To add something to a tally. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "up." Hank just scored a basket, so chalk one up for him. Chalk up a few more states for the incumbent.
4. To attribute something to something else (which is stated after "to"). A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "up." They're a very young team, so we'll chalk this loss up to inexperience and nerves.
5. To blame one for something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chalk" and "up." I had nothing to do with the prank, but I'm sure they'll chalk it up against me anyway.
See also: chalk, up

chalk (something) up to (something)

To attribute something to something else (which is stated after "to"). They're a very young team, so we'll chalk this loss up to inexperience and nerves.
See also: chalk, up

chalk something out

 
1. Lit. to draw a picture of something in chalk, especially to illustrate a plan of some type. The coach chalked the play out so the players could understand what they were to do. Our team captain chalked out the play.
2. Fig. to explain something carefully to someone, as if one were talking about a chalk drawing. She chalked out the details of the plan over the phone.
See also: chalk, out

chalk something up

 
1. Lit. to write something on a chalkboard. Let me chalk this formula up so you all can see it. I'll chalk up the formula.
2. Fig. to add a mark or point to one's score. See also chalk something up (against someone).) Chalk another goal for Sarah. Chalk up another basket for the other side.
See also: chalk, up

chalk something up

(against someone) Fig. to blame someone for something; to register something against someone. I will have to chalk another fault up against Fred. She chalked up a mark against Dave.
See also: chalk, up

chalk something up (to something)

Fig. to recognize something as the cause of something else. We chalked her bad behavior up to her recent illness. I had to chalk up the loss to inexperience.
See also: chalk, up

not by a long shot

Fig. not by a great amount; not at all. Did I win the race? Not by a long shot. Not by a long shot did she complete the assignment.
See also: long, not, shot

chalk up something

also chalk something up
to record something special Many banks chalked up large profits from their loans to internet companies.
Etymology: based on the idea of keeping a record on a chalk board
See also: chalk, up

chalk something up to something else

also chalk something up to something else
to say that something is caused by something else She doesn't even bother to say thank you, but I just chalk it up to bad manners and try not to let it bother me.
See also: chalk, up

not by a long shot

not at all “Do you think it's as good as her last movie?” “ No, not by a long shot.”
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form not do something by a long shot: We haven't eliminated the disease by a long shot.
See also: long, not, shot

be (like) chalk and cheese

  (British & Australian) also be as different as chalk and cheese (British & Australian)
if two people are like chalk and cheese, they are completely different from each other I don't have anything in common with my brother. We're like chalk and cheese.
See put down to experience
See also: and, chalk, cheese

at the chalkface

a teacher who is at the chalkface is teaching students, and is not working in any other kind of job connected with education The media give a picture of falling standards in schools, but there is optimism at the chalkface.

put something down to experience

  (British, American & Australian) also chalk something up to experience (American & Australian)
to decide that instead of being upset about something bad that you have done or that has happened, you will learn from it 'I'm so ashamed. I let him take advantage of me.' 'Don't be so hard on yourself. Just put it down to experience.'
See also: down, experience, put

not by a long shot

  (informal) also not by a long chalk (old-fashioned)
something that you say when you think something is not at all true 'Do you think it's as good as her last movie?' 'No, not by a long shot.' It's not over yet, not by a long chalk, we still have a very good chance of winning.
See also: long, not, shot

chalk up

1. Score or earn, as in She chalked up enough points to be seeded first in the tournament. This term alludes to recording accounts (and later, scores) in chalk on a slate. [c. 1700]
2. Credit or ascribe, as They chalked their success up to experience. [First half of 1900s]
See also: chalk, up

chalk up

v.
1. To earn or score something: The baseball team chalked up four runs in the last inning.
2. To credit or ascribe something: Let's just chalk the mistakes up to experience and try to do better on the next project.
See also: chalk, up

chalk and cheese

Two objects that although appearing to be similar are in fact different. Just as certain varieties of crumbly white cheese might at first glance resemble chalk, so for example, siblings who resemble each other might have completely different personalities. They would be said to be as different as chalk and cheese.
See also: and, chalk, cheese
References in classic literature ?
Dolly was completely comforted in the depression caused by her conversation with Alexey Alexandrovitch when she caught sight of the two figures: Kitty with the chalk in her hand, with a shy and happy smile looking upwards at Levin, and his handsome figure bending over the table with glowing eyes fastened one minute on the table and the next on her.
He snatched the chalk with nervous, trembling fingers, and breaking it, wrote the initial letters of the following phrase, "I have nothing to forget and to forgive; I have never ceased to love you.
2, White chalks, Red color chalks, Yellow color chalks, White non dust chalks, Color non dust chalks,
These trendsetters have now millions of young girls and women following their hair craze, creating new looks using soft hair chalks.
nd] year, the Pasadena Chalk Festival places over 25,000 sticks of pastel chalks in the hands of hundreds of madonnari(Italian for street painter) to spend the weekend on their hands and knees creating spectacular murals on concrete areas throughout the shopping center that stretches over three city blocks.
Louise Carey chalks up her latest work outside the Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff Bay PICTURE: Peter Bolter
He said, "The girls paid pounds 1 for 25 pavement chalks and they created girlie pictures on a path.
Dy-Mark marking chalks are designed as inverted aerosols with a fast drying formula and last up to 30 days.
1 -- color) Traffic Officer Susan Artian chalks a tire Monday of an abandoned Chevy Eurosport.
Featuring the patented Spray-Thru[TM] cap and non-clogging spray tip, Quik-Mark inverted marking chalks are quick and easy to apply.
st] year, the Pasadena Chalk Festival places over 25,000 sticks of pastel chalks in the hands of hundreds of Madonnari(Italian for street painter) to spend the weekend creating spectacular murals on concrete areas throughout the shopping center that stretches over three city blocks.
For this weekend's event, he won't know his subject until he sits down with his chalk board erasers, Dustbuster and tray of chalks of all colors, each carefully separated in advance by his 16-year-old daughter, Amber.
Based in New Jersey, Hair Chalkify is able to ship safe, non-toxic hair chalks to customers all over the world.