cent


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cut off with a cent

To be intentionally disinherited from a will by being bequeathed a single cent rather than left nothing at all. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. My father never liked that I gave up medicine to become a writer, and he cut me off with a cent when he died.
See also: cent, cut, off

feel like two cents

To have a feeling of complete worthlessness or unimportance, likened to the paltry value of two cents. I'm glad to have finally broken up with Steven, he always made me feel like two cents.
See also: cent, feel, like, two

give (one's) two cents

To share one's opinion or point of view for whatever it may be worth, generally when it is unasked for. I find Jeff's husband a bit trying at times. He always insists on giving his two cents whether we want his opinion or not! If I can just give my two cents, I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay.
See also: cent, give, two

give (one's) two cents' worth

To share one's opinion or point of view for whatever it may be worth, generally when it is unasked for. I find Jeff's husband a bit trying at times. He always insists on giving his two cents' worth whether we want his opinion or not! If I can just give my two cents' worth, I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay.
See also: give, two, worth

put in (one's) two cents

To share one's opinion or point of view for whatever it may be worth, generally when it is unasked for. I find Jeff's husband a bit trying at times. He always insists on putting in his two cents whether we want his opinion or not! If I can just put in my two cents, I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay.
See also: cent, put, two

put in (one's) two cents' worth

To share one's opinion or point of view for whatever it may be worth, generally when it is unasked for. I find Jeff's husband a bit trying at times. He always insists on putting in his two cents' worth whether we want his opinion or not! If I can just put in my two cents' worth, I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay.
See also: put, two, worth

red cent

The smallest possible amount of money. Primarily heard in US. I worked all of that overtime and never received a red cent for my efforts.
See also: cent, red

not worth a red cent

Worthless. I don't know how I'm going to tell that woman that her prized collectibles are not worth a red cent.
See also: cent, not, red, worth

two cents

One's opinion or point of view for whatever it may be worth, generally when it is unasked for. I find Jeff's husband a bit trying at times. He always insists on putting in his two cents whether we want his opinion or not! Here's my two cents: I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay.
See also: cent, two

cut off

 
1. to stop by itself or oneself. The machine got hot and cut off. Bob cut off in midsentence.
2. to turn off a road, path, highway, etc. This is the place where you are supposed to cut off. When you come to a cutoff on the left, continue on for about mile.
See also: cut, off

cut someone or something off (from something)

to block or isolate someone or something from some place or something. They cut the cattle off from the wheat field. The enemy tanks cut off the troops from their camp.
See also: cut, off

cut someone or something off (short)

Fig. to interrupt someone or something; to prevent someone from continuing to speak. (See also chop someone off.) In the middle of her sentence, the teacher cut her off short. Bob cut off Mary when she was trying to explain.
See also: cut, off

cut something off

 
1. to shorten something. Cut this board off a bit, would you? Cut off this board a little, please.
2. to turn something off, such as power, electricity, water, the engine, etc. Would you please cut that engine off? Cut off the engine, Chuck.
See also: cut, off

He wears a ten-dollar hat on a five-cent head.

Rur. He is stupid but rich. He got the job because he's the boss's son, not because he's smart. He wears a ten-dollar hat on a five-cent head.
See also: hat, he, head, on, wear

not worth a damn

Inf. worthless. This pen is not worth a damn. When it comes to keeping score, she's not worth a damn.
See also: damn, not, worth

not worth a dime

 and not worth a red cent
worthless. This land is all swampy. It's not worth a dime. This pen I bought isn't worth a dime. It has no ink.
See also: dime, not, worth

put one's oar in

 and stick one's oar in; put one's two cents(' worth) in
Fig. to add one's comments or opinion, even if unwanted or unasked for. You don't need to put your oar in. I don't need your advice. I'm sorry. I shouldn't have stuck my oar in when you were arguing with your wife. Do you mind if I put in my oar? I have a suggestion. There is no need for you to put in your two cents' worth.
See also: oar, put

put your two cents in

also put in your two cents
to give your opinion She believes it's her duty to vote and put her two cents in.
See also: cent, put, two

for two cents

without needing much encouragement You're so spoiled and nasty that for two cents I'd throw you out in the street.
See also: cent, two

dollars-and-cents

  (American & Australian)
if something is discussed or thought about in a dollars-and-cents way, the exact amounts of money involved are thought about (always before noun) The dollars-and-cents details of the new budget will be presented tomorrow by the government.

put/stick your oar in

  (British & Australian informal)
to involve yourself in a discussion or a situation when other people do not want you to I don't want Janet coming to the meeting and sticking her oar in - she knows nothing about the situation.
See also: oar, put

not a red cent

  (American informal)
no money at all
Usage notes: A cent is the smallest coin in value in American money and is worth very little.
I did all that work for them and they didn't pay me a red cent! It turns out his paintings aren't worth a red cent.
See also: cent, red

for two cents

  (American & Australian informal)
if you say that for two cents you would do something unpleasant to someone, you mean that you want very much to do it to them
Usage notes: A cent is the coin with the smallest value in American money and two cents is worth very little.
For two cents I'd hit him. He's so darned spoiled and stuck up.
See also: cent, two

put your two cents (worth) in

  (American & Australian informal)
to give your opinion in a conversation, often when it is not wanted She always has to put her two cents worth in! Why can't she just keep quiet?
See also: cent, put, two

cut off

1. Separate from others, isolate, as in The construction debris cut off the workers from the canteen, or The new sect was cut off from the church. [Late 1500s]
2. Stop suddenly, discontinue, as in He quickly cut off the engine, or The drama was cut off by a news flash about tornado warnings. [Late 1500s]
3. Shut off, bar, Their phone was cut off when they didn't pay the bill, or Tom's father threatened to cut off his allowance. [c. 1600]
4. Interrupt the course or passage of, intercept, as in The operator cut us off, or The shortstop cut off the throw to the plate. [Late 1500s]
5. Also, cut off with a shilling or cent . Disinherit, as in Grandfather cut him off with a shilling. This usage dates from the early 1700s; the purpose of bequeathing one shilling (a small sum) was to indicate that the heir had not been overlooked but was intentionally being disinherited. In America cent was substituted from about 1800 on.
See also: cut, off

for two cents

For nothing; for a petty sum. For example, For two cents I'd quit the club entirely. Similarly, like two cents, means "of little or no value or importance, worthless," as in She made me feel like two cents. The use of two cents in this sense is thought to be derived from a similar British use of twopence or tuppence, which dates from about 1600. The American coin was substituted in the 1800s, along with two bits, slang for 25 cents and also meaning "a petty sum." Similarly, put in one's two cents or two cents' worth , meaning "to express one's unsolicited opinion for whatever it is worth," dates from the late 1800s.
See also: cent, two

not worth a damn

Also, not worth a plugged nickel or red cent or bean or hill of beans or fig or straw or tinker's damn . Worthless, as in That car isn't worth a damn, or My new tennis racket is not worth a plugged nickel. As for the nouns here, a damn or curse is clearly of no great value (also see not give a damn); a plugged nickel in the 1800s referred to a debased five-cent coin; a cent denotes the smallest American coin, which was red when made of pure copper (1800s); a bean has been considered trivial or worthless since the late 1300s (Chaucer so used it), whereas hill of beans alludes to a planting method whereby four or five beans are put in a mound (and still are worthless); and both fig and straw have been items of no worth since about 1400. A tinker's dam, first recorded in 1877, was a wall of dough raised around a spot where a metal pipe is being repaired so as to hold solder in place until it hardens, whereupon the dam is discarded. However, tinker's damn was first recorded in 1839 and probably was merely an intensification of "not worth a damn," rather than having anything to do with the dam.
See also: damn, not, worth

put in one's two cents

see under for two cents.
See also: cent, put, two

red cent

see under not worth a dime.
See also: cent, red

cut off

v.
1. To remove something by cutting: I cut off the tree branch. He cut his beard off.
2. To interrupt someone who is speaking: Don't cut me off like that. The speaker was cut off by the crowd. The principal cut off the discussion when the assembly started.
3. To separate someone from others; isolate someone: I don't want to cut my brother off from his friends. She was cut off from her family while she was gone. All contact was cut off.
4. To stop something from functioning by disconnecting it from its source of power: Cut the power off. The landlord cut off the heat. The lights got cut off.
5. To interrupt the course or passage of something: The infielder cut off the throw to the plate. The police cut all the routes of escape off.
6. To interrupt or break the line of communication of someone: The telephone operator cut us off. The storm cut off the phone lines.
7. To stop or come to an end suddenly: The music suddenly cut off.
8. To change from one direction to another: The road goes straight over the hill and then cuts off to the right around the pond.
9. To disinherit someone: They cut their heirs off without a cent. My parents changed their will and cut me off after I left home.
10. To discontinue the funding for something, such as a government program: School breakfasts were cut off after the funding cuts. The mayor cut off free school lunches from the budget.
11. To drive into the space in front of a moving car, often suddenly and recklessly: That taxi cut me off on the highway. The truck cut off the small car abruptly.
See also: cut, off

cent

n. one dollar. (Underworld.) One cent for one joint? Not bad.

not worth a damn

mod. worthless. When it comes to keeping score, she’s not worth a damn.
See also: damn, not, worth

a good five-cent cigar

A sensibly affordable item. The remark “What this country needs is a good five-cent cigar” was popularized by Thomas Riley Marshall, vice president of the United States under Woodrow Wilson. In one account, he made the remark while presiding in the Senate after he heard a succession of senators enumerate what was lacking in the United States. The remark, which most likely originated with a 19th-century humorist named Kin Hubbard, was appropriated by several generations of Americans to complain obliquely about overpriced items of any sort.
See also: cigar, good
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