cease

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cease to be

To die, expire, or no longer exist. (Used without a qualifying verb, noun, or adjective; otherwise, the cessation merely refers to said verb, noun, or adjective—e.g., "cease to be entertained.") After the recession, many of the small businesses populating the mall simply ceased to be. Without her love, I feel that I would cease to be!
See also: cease

cease and desist

To stop doing something. This phrase is typically associated with legal matters. We received a letter ordering us to cease and desist due to copyright infringement, so we had to halt production.
See also: and, cease, desist

cease and desist

to completely stop doing something. (A legal phrase.) The judge ordered the merchant to cease and desist the deceptive practices. When they were ordered to cease and desist, they finally stopped.
See also: and, cease, desist

Wonders never cease!

 and Will wonders never Cease!
Prov. What an amazing thing has happened! (Said when something very surprising happens. Somewhat ironic; can imply that the surprising thing should have happened before, but did not.) Fred: Hi, honey. I cleaned the kitchen for you. Ellen: Wonders never cease! Jill: Did you hear? The company is allowing us to take a holiday tomorrow. Jane: Wonders never cease! Not only was my plane on time, the airline also delivered my luggage safely. Will wonders never cease?
See also: never, Wonder

cease and desist

Stop, leave off doing something, as in: "Bliss excavated at least once on his own and Dr. Brand ... told him to cease and desist" (Douglas Preston quoting Frank Hibben, The New Yorker, June 12, 1995). This legal term is a redundancy, since cease and desist mean virtually the same thing, but often appears in legal documents to avoid possible misinterpretation. [c. 1920]
See also: and, cease, desist

wonders will never cease

What a surprise, as in He's on time-wonders will never cease. This expression is generally used ironically. [Late 1700s]
See also: cease, never, will, wonder

ˌwonders will ˌnever ˈcease

(spoken, usually ironic) used to express surprise and pleasure at something: ‘The train was on time today.’ ‘Wonders will never cease (= I am surprised, because usually it is late).’
See also: cease, never, will, wonder
References in classic literature ?
He had noticed, however, that the prisoner on the other side had ceased to labor; no matter, this was a greater reason for proceeding -- if his neighbor would not come to him, he would go to his neighbor.
He was surprised at himself because he ceased to believe so easily, and, not knowing that he felt as he did on account of the subtle workings of his inmost nature, he ascribed the certainty he had reached to his own cleverness.
Presently she resumed as though she had not ceased speaking.
The tinkling of glasses and the sort murmuring of whispered conversation had ceased during Francis' story.
But he ceased his yelping to listen to a new noise--a thunderous slatting of canvas accompanied by shouts and cries.
But in those items the ancient was intact, although one leg ceased midway between knee and thigh.
Half-way to the steamer the ancient ceased wheezing and spoke, nodding his head at Michael.
When the master appeared, all other beings ceased to exist so far as White Fang was concerned.
Knowing his deadly method of fighting, the master had never ceased impressing upon White Fang the law that he must not fight.
The bushes were now quiet and the sounds had ceased, but Morgan was as attentive to the place as before.
Not a train ran, not a telegraphic message went over the wires, for the telegraphers and railroad men had ceased work along with the rest of the population.
Sun shines out - rain ceased - even Boarham's not afraid to venture in his waterproof boots; and Wilmot and I are going to beat you all.
As soon as the maidens recognised Zarathustra, they ceased dancing; Zarathustra, however, approached them with friendly mein and spake these words:
But at that moment the racers started, and all conversation ceased.
I rushed towards her and embraced her with ardour, but the deadly languor and coldness of the limbs told me that what I now held in my arms had ceased to be the Elizabeth whom I had loved and cherished.