catch (the) headlines

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catch (the) headlines

To be featured on the headlines of news articles, as due to being particularly important, popular, fashionable, etc. It may not be so tremendous as to catch the headlines, but this small change in immigration law could have a huge impact on foreign workers. The pop star caught headlines yesterday after his latest run-in with police.
See also: catch, headline
References in periodicals archive ?
1-inch display, while Mate 7 measures six inches and boasts of an aluminium unibody with rear-mounted fingerprint scanner to catch the headlines.
As Watt continued to catch the headlines with the crucial goal against the Spaniards, Fraser is convinced he can become the latest teenage talent to emerge from Celtic's production line.
I knew that it had to be a real challenge, something that would catch the headlines which is why I decided on a half-marathon.
They tear down past government achievements to catch the headlines, rather than building towards our collective future needs.
You can catch the headlines on satellite television, sip an evening drink and nibble complimentary canaps, or surf the net in comfortable surroundings.
It is the deaths of the young that catch the headlines.
But whilst big cutbacks like those catch the headlines, the drip by drip effect of small scale redundancies in small businesses can be equally damaging to employment.
While the Conservatives' gimmicky proposals have been designed to catch the headlines, their record in office is of boom and bust.
In the Commons yesterday Shadow Foreign Secretary William Hague, standing in for Tory leader David Cameron, accused Mr Blair of "posturing" on the issue and said: "Wouldn't it be better to have a watertight law designed to catch the guilty, rather than a press release law designed to catch the headlines.
By and large we have a good disciplinary record as a League, but we do get isolated incidents which catch the headlines," said Drakes chairman Roger France.
True, England's Paul Casey at 26 will have benefited from his day at the head of the leaderboard, Darren Clarke showed fleeting flashes of form and Ian Poulter some day might catch the headlines for his play rather than the cut and colour of his trousers.
Only the excesses of Palestinian bombers seem to catch the headlines.
Fast free-flowing rugby may catch the headlines, but former Scottish skipper Hastings is convinced the form of the kickers will be the key to the eventual winners' success.
Anyone who forgets and switches on at 10pm to catch the headlines, might be in for a shock when they see Pierce Brosnan happily dealing with secret agents and over-the-top baddies instead of Tony Blair and the Euro.
The actions of a few hate-filled yobs with a bucket of paint might catch the headlines, but they won't change the facts.