carry off


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carry off

1. To complete or do something successfully, especially when faced with obstacles. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." I never expected to carry off the party once the caterer suddenly quit, but everyone seems to have had a great time!
2. To steal something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." I think someone carried off our new porch furniture—it's nowhere in sight! Ethel forgot to put that expensive necklace in the safe, and one of the party guests carried it off.
3. To physically move someone or something away from a certain location. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Luckily, the lifeguard was able to rescue Dan after the current carried him off.
4. To win a prize or contest. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Everyone was shocked when that little-known band carried off the night's biggest award.
5. To cause one's death. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Unfortunately, the injuries from the accident were so severe that they carried him off.
See also: carry, off

carry someone or something off

to take or steal someone or something. The kidnappers carried the child off. They carried off the child.
See also: carry, off

carry something off

 
1. Lit. to take something away with oneself; to steal something. Someone carried off my books! I think someone carried off the lawn chairs last night.
2. Fig. to make a planned event work out successfully. It was a huge party, but the hostess carried it off beautifully. The magician carried off the trick with great skill.
See also: carry, off

carry off

1. Handle successfully, win, as in It was a difficult situation, but he managed to carry it off gracefully, or They carried off first prize. [First half of 1800s]
2. Cause the death of someone, as in The new African virus carried off an entire village. This usage is less common today. [Late 1600s]
See also: carry, off

carry off

v.
1. To pick up something or someone and move away: The wind carried off the balloon. The criminal frowned as the police carried him off.
2. To steal something or someone: The bandits broke into the farmyard and carried off the chickens. The painting was the city's most treasured possession until thieves carried it off.
3. To handle or accomplish something successfully: The performance was unrehearsed, but we carried it off without a problem. The host carried off the event beautifully.
4. To win something, as an award or prize: The film carried off four of the top prizes. The prize was $10,000, and I was determined to carry it off.
5. To cause the death of someone: Heart disease finally carried him off. Many pioneers were carried off by fever.
See also: carry, off
References in periodicals archive ?
It takes talent to carry off something as potentially fraught as 10 singers on stage at once, and it would benefit the act if it took chances with contemporary material rather than tired-sounding pop ballads.
As well as league runners-up, they lifted the Terry Murphy Memorial Trophy and the Cleveland Cup, while the U17s, in the same division, finished third and then defeated the champions to carry off the Stephen Dean Memorial Rosebowl.
BENTLEY ROAD thwarted Fife Street A's bid to carry off the Worthington Nuneaton Friday Night Games League's Tennents Darts Trophy for the third consecutive season thanks to victory in a last game decider.
Lloyd has the strong, masculine voice to carry off these stories of men and the challenges they meet.
Most people with schizophrenia are much too ill to carry off double lives.
You need a fab figure to carry off a dress this clingy and shiny, and not look like a big trout - and that's no way to talk about boyfriend, Jamie - sorry, Jammy - Theakston.
This is by no means an easy scene to write or carry off, but Kober nails it.
Scourby's voice has the right combination of sophistication and hope to carry off the sweet bitterness of all these stories.