carpet

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Related to carpets: Rugs

brush (something) under the carpet

To ignore, deny, or conceal from public view or knowledge something that is embarrassing, unappealing, or damaging to one's reputation. The senator has been accused of trying to sweep his former drug use under the carpet. You need to stop sweeping your problems under the carpet.
See also: brush, carpet

put out the red carpet (for someone)

1. Literally, to unroll a large red rug or carpet for a very distinguished or important guest to walk on. The theater put out the red carpet for the duke, who was attending the opening night of the play that evening.
2. By extension, to welcome someone with a great or elaborate display of hospitality, ceremony, or fanfare. Since Jake was their only child, Robert and Sarah always put out the red carpet for him whenever he returned home from college. We're just popping by for a cup of tea and a quick catch-up, no need to put out the red carpet!
See also: carpet, out, put, red

drug on the market

Something that is not in great demand because it is abundantly available. Mobile phones are a drug on the market these days, which is why they're so affordable.
See also: drug, market, on

magic carpet

A carpet capable of propelling itself through the air, usually as people ride on it. Typically featured in fantasy stories and fairy tales. My kids love hearing fantastical stories that are full of monsters, spells, and magic carpet rides.
See also: carpet, magic

under the carpet

Kept secret or hidden from view, usually due to one's misfortune or embarrassment. The phrase is typically used with the verbs "sweep" and "brush," likened to how dirt would be swept under a carpet to hastily hide it. We need to sweep this scandal under the carpet as soon as possible. I was so mortified by my mistake that I immediately tried to brush it under the carpet.
See also: carpet

call (one) on the carpet

To scold, rebuke, or reprimand someone. When my team lost that big client, the boss called me on the carpet.
See also: call, carpet, on

roll out the red carpet (for someone)

1. Literally, to unroll a large red rug or carpet for a very distinguished or important guest to walk on. The theater rolled out the red carpet for the duke, who was attending the opening night of the play that evening.
2. By extension, to welcome someone with great or elaborate hospitality, ceremony, or fanfare. Since Jake is their only child, Robert and Sarah always roll out the red carpet for him whenever he returns home from college. We're just popping by for a cup of tea and a quick catch-up, no need to roll out the red carpet!
See also: carpet, out, red, roll

sweep (something) under the carpet

To ignore, deny, or conceal from public view or knowledge something that is embarrassing, unappealing, or damaging to one's reputation. The senator has been accused of trying to sweep his former drug use under the carpet. You need to stop sweeping your problems under the carpet. Nothing will get resolved like that!
See also: carpet, sweep

on the carpet

1. Facing rebuke from someone. When my team lost that big client, the boss called me on the carpet.
2. Under discussion or consideration. We don't have time to discuss those issues, but don't worry, they'll be on the carpet the next time we meet.
See also: carpet, on

call someone on the carpet

 and haul someone on the carpet
Fig. to reprimand a person. (When done by someone of clear superiority. Haul is stronger than call.) One more error like that and the big boss will call you on the carpet. I'm sorry it went wrong. I really hope the regional manager doesn't call me on the carpet again.
See also: call, carpet, on

*red-carpet treatment

Fig. very special treatment; royal treatment. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) I love to go to fancy stores where I get the red-carpet treatment. The queen expects to get the red-carpet treatment wherever she goes.
See also: treatment

roll out the red carpet

 (for someone)
1. Lit. to unwind a roll of red carpet for someone important to walk on. The city council decided to roll out the red carpet for the visit of the foreign prince.
2. Fig. to give someone treatment befitting royalty. The citizens of the small community enjoyed rolling out the red carpet for important visitors.
See also: carpet, out, red, roll

sweep something under the carpet

 
1. Lit. to hide dirt by brushing it away under the edge of a carpet. He was in such a hurry with the cleaning that he just swept the dirt under the carpet. She swept the dirt under the carpet, hoping no one would find it.
2. Fig. to hide or ignore something. You made a mistake that you can't sweep under the carpet. Don't try to sweep it under the carpet. You are wrong!
See also: carpet, sweep

call on the carpet

Summon for a scolding or rebuke, as in Suspecting a leak to the press, the governor called his press secretary on the carpet. This term began as on the carpet, which in the early 1700s referred to a cloth (carpet) covering a conference table and therefore came to mean "under consideration or discussion." In 19th-century America, however, carpet meant "floor covering," and the expression, first recorded in 1902, alluded to being called before or reprimanded by a person rich or powerful enough to have a carpet.
See also: call, carpet, on

drug on the market

A commodity whose supply greatly exceeds the demand for it. For example, Now that asbestos is considered dangerous, asbestos tile is a drug on the market. The use of the noun drug in the sense of "something overabundant" (as opposed to a medicine or narcotic) dates from the mid-1600s, but the first record of the full expression, put as drug in the market, dates only from the 1830s.
See also: drug, market, on

red carpet

Honorary treatment, lavish hospitality, as in We'll have to get out the red carpet for the President's visit. This term comes from the literal practice of rolling out a carpet to welcome a royal or other esteemed guest, and indeed is often put as roll out the red carpet. [Early 1900s]
See also: carpet, red

blood on the carpet

If there is blood on the carpet, there is trouble within an organization as a result of a struggle between people or groups. `There will be blood on the carpet,' commented one insider, `if this scheme fails'. They seemed to be able to work together without too much blood on the carpet.
See also: blood, carpet, on

on the carpet

BRITISH
If someone is on the carpet, they are in trouble for doing something wrong. The 22-year-old bad boy of English cricket was on the carpet again this week for arguing with the umpire. Note: You can also call someone on the carpet. In my hospital, if I allowed a nurse to work alongside me without wearing gloves, I'd be called on the carpet immediately for not protecting our staff. Note: This expression may refer to a piece of carpet in front of a desk where someone stands while being reprimanded. Alternatively, it could refer to an employer calling a servant into one of the best rooms in the house, which would have a carpet, in order to reprimand them.
See also: carpet, on

roll out the red carpet

If you roll out the red carpet for someone, especially someone famous or important, you give them a special welcome and treat them as an honoured guest. The museum staff rolled out the red carpet; although it was a Sunday, the deputy director came in especially to show us round. The red carpet was rolled out for Mr Honecker during his visit to Bonn in 1987. Note: You can also talk about red carpet treatment or a red carpet welcome. Last week he gave the red carpet treatment to some of Spain's most right-wing business people. Officials gave him a red-carpet welcome at the Government Guest House. Note: When royalty or other important guests visit a country, a strip of red carpet is often put on the ground for them to walk on.
See also: carpet, out, red, roll

sweep something under the carpet

BRITISH
COMMON If you sweep a problem under the carpet, you try to hide it and forget about it. People often hope that if they sweep something under the carpet the problem will go away, but that is not the case. Note: Verbs such as brush and push are sometimes used instead of sweep. The problem has been brushed under the carpet for decades. Note: The usual American expression is sweep something under the rug.
See also: carpet, something, sweep

blood on the carpet

used to refer in an exaggerated way to a serious disagreement or its aftermath.
1984 Times The last thing I want now is blood on the boardroom carpet.
See also: blood, carpet, on

a magic carpet

a means of sudden and effortless travel.
In fairy tales, a magic carpet is able to transport a person sitting on it to any place they desire.
See also: carpet, magic

on the carpet

1 (of a topic or problem) under discussion. 2 (of a person) being severely reprimanded by someone in authority. informal
Carpet in both these senses originally meant ‘table covering’, and referred to ‘the carpet of the council table’, a table around which a problem was debated (as in sense 1) or before which a person would be summoned for reprimand (as in sense 2). The informal use of carpet as a verb meaning ‘reprove’ dates from mid 19th century.
See also: carpet, on

sweep something under the carpet

hide or ignore a problem or difficulty in the hope that it will be forgotten.
1996 Iain Pears Death & Restoration Many others would merely have swept all our problems under the carpet, and left them until they became too difficult to solve.
See also: carpet, something, sweep

the red carpet

used in reference to privileged treatment of a distinguished visitor.
See also: carpet, red

be on the ˈcarpet

(informal, especially American English) be criticized, especially by an employer or somebody in authority, because you have done something wrong: She’s on the carpet for spending too much of the company’s money on entertaining guests.
See also: carpet, on

sweep/brush something under the ˈcarpet

(American English also sweep something under the ˈrug) (informal) hide something which might cause trouble, or which you do not want other people to know: No matter how unwelcome the results of the enquiry may be, they must not be swept under the carpet.

pull the ˌcarpet/ˌrug out from under somebody’s ˈfeet

(informal) take the help, support or confidence away from somebody suddenly: I was just about to ask her out when she pulled the rug out from under my feet by telling me she’s getting married next month.The bank’s pulled the carpet out from under his feet, unfortunately. It looks as if he’ll have to sell the business.
See also: carpet, feet, out, pull, rug

the red ˈcarpet

a very special welcome given to an important visitor: When I went to my girlfriend’s house for the first time, her family really put out the red carpet for me.It was an unofficial visit so the guests didn’t get the usual red carpet treatment.
A strip of red carpet is usually laid on the ground for an important visitor to walk on when he or she arrives.
See also: carpet, red

laugh at the carpet

in. to vomit; to vomit on a carpet. Tom bent over and laughed at the carpet, much to the embarrassment of the entire group.
See also: carpet, laugh

on the carpet

1. In a position of being reprimanded by one in authority: was called on the carpet for cheating.
2. Under discussion or consideration: Important matters will be on the carpet at today's meeting.
See also: carpet, on

roll out the red carpet

To welcome with great hospitality or ceremony.
See also: carpet, out, red, roll
References in classic literature ?
The carpet - of Saxony material - is quite half an inch thick, and is of the same crimson ground, relieved simply by the appearance of a gold cord (like that festooning the curtains) slightly relieved above the surface of the ground, and thrown upon it in such a manner as to form a succession of short irregular curves - one occasionally overlaying the other.
He was only a boy, as she was only a girl--two young things on the threshold of life, house- renting and buying carpets together.
The Ladies' Aid bought it for me--and wasn't it lovely of them, when they wanted the carpet so?
She had previously made a respectful virgin-like curtsey to the gentleman, and her modest eyes gazed so perseveringly on the carpet that it was a wonder how she should have found an opportunity to see him.
That money went to buy better carpets and a better stove.
So you would carpet your room - or your husband's room, if you were a grown woman, and had a husband - with representations of flowers, would you?
Sam was so very busy with his own thoughts, that it is probable he would have taken no more notice of the young woman than just raising his head and remarking that she had a very neat and pretty figure, if his feelings of gallantry had not been most strongly roused by observing that she had no one to help her, and that the carpets seemed too heavy for her single strength.
Two women-servants came out with pails and brooms and brushes, and gave the sidewalk a thorough scrubbing; meanwhile two others scrubbed the four marble steps which led up to the door; beyond these we could see some men-servants taking up the carpet of the grand staircase.
An' there'll be peach an' plum trees in bloom against th' walls, an' th' grass'll be a carpet o' flowers.
Altogether, the box was the most ordinary box in the world, with its red hangings, its chairs, its carpet and its ledge covered in red velvet.
The path they were following led them through a wood of pine-trees carpeted with heather and blue-berry, and upon this pleasant carpet, Dick, not without some seriousness, made her sit down.
This dazzling carpet, really a reflector, repelled the rays of the sun with wonderful intensity, which accounted for the vibration which penetrated every atom of liquid.
This mount of bright colours descended diagonally from the first floor to the carpet that covered the sidewalk.
The seventh apartment was closely shrouded in black velvet tapestries that hung all over the ceiling and down the walls, falling in heavy folds upon a carpet of the same material and hue.
His hat tumbled to the carpet, his heavy umbrella slipped between his knees with a thud; he reached after the one and ducked after the other, but with an unimpaired smile on his round face spoke simultaneously as follows: