caring


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beyond caring

Unable or unwilling to devote more time and attention to a particular person or issue. Give him anything he wants in the divorce settlement—I'm just beyond caring anymore. I'm a senior now, so I'm beyond caring about what the catty girls at school say.
See also: beyond, caring

(not) care a fig

To be concerned about someone or something. Typically used in the negative to convey the opposite. I don't care a fig about making money, I just want to do something with my life that makes life better for others. I haven't cared a fig for the show ever since they killed off my favorite character. Do whatever you want, I don't care a fig.
See also: care, fig

(not) care a hoot

To be concerned about someone or something. Typically used in the negative to convey the opposite. I don't care a hoot about making money, I just want to do something with my life that makes life better for others. I haven't cared a hoot for the show ever since they killed off my favorite character. Do whatever you want, I don't care a hoot.
See also: care, hoot

(not) care a toss

slang To be concerned about someone or something. Typically used in the negative to convey the opposite. Primarily heard in UK. I don't care a toss about making money, I just want to do something with my life that makes life better for others. I haven't cared a toss for the show ever since they killed off my favorite character. Do whatever you want, I don't care a toss.
See also: care, toss

care for (someone or something)

1. To act as a caretaker for someone or something. We need to hire a nurse to care for grandpa when he gets out of the hospital. Judging by the overgrown weeds and broken shutters, no one has been caring for this house.
2. To have a strong feeling of love or affection for someone or something; to cherish someone or something. There is nothing I care for more than my children.
3. To like someone or something. Often used in the negative to mean the opposite. I know you don't care for asparagus, so I made string beans instead.
See also: care

care to (do something)

1. To be interested in doing a particular action or activity. Often used in the negative to mean the opposite. No thanks, I don't care to jog today—my legs still hurt from yesterday's trip to the gym.
2. Would you like to (do a particular action or activity)? I'm going out for a jog—care to join me?
See also: care

past caring

Fig. [of someone] beyond caring about someone or something that is hopeless. I don't care what you do! I'm past caring!
See also: caring, past
References in periodicals archive ?
They then see themselves as partners with management in creating a setting that is caring, safe and comfortable.
In addition to changing the relationship between the public and the PWD, commodification of family support responsibilities could upset delicate balances in these caring relationships.
are caring for their fathers, twice as many (44%) are caring
Walsh wrote of the plight of the needy aged: "With regard to this problem--the care of the aged poor--I may say at once that our present mode of caring for them [in 1916] is almost barbarous.
Managing the health of an enrolled population within a budget is quite different than managing an organization or caring for a patient in the open-ended, cost-plus, fee-for-service environment that prevailed following World War II.
Hospital staff, however, will save time performing oral care on the front end, rather than spending time on the back end caring for more critically-ill patients who acquire pneumonia.
But its features included committed health care professionals, caring local institutions, freedom of choice, and laws reflecting public confidence.
One may even make the case that caring for a patient in assisted living facilities is less costly than caring for a patient at home.
It is critical that physician training, focused specifically on palliative care, be available so that the art of caring for dying persons is better understood by medical professionals at all levels," commented Carla Alexander, M.
For physicians who work in HMOs concerned with quality, the distinction between caring for individuals--patients one at a time--and populations of patients is central to success.
These centers tend to be small and may have less experience caring for complicated cases.