care to (do something)

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care to (do something)

1. To be interested in doing a particular action or activity. Often used in the negative to mean the opposite. No thanks, I don't care to jog today—my legs still hurt from yesterday's trip to the gym.
2. Would you like to (do a particular action or activity)? I'm going out for a jog—care to join me?
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
In a move that seemed ingenious then because health care was comparatively cheap, the federal government passed laws offering economic incentives to businesses that provided health care to employees.
In the last 10 years, VA has shifted its mental health services away from inpatient care to more accessible outpatient and residential care.
That will mean levels of health care consumption that will dwarf anything spent on medical care to date.
The government is just getting ready to report on the results of a two-year trial of so-called extended-care community packages, which are designed to deliver nursing home care to people in their homes.
Managed cafe's population base and health system strengths, combined with its involvement in the delivery of care to specific persons, create the opportunity to use new capabilities and resources to address healthcare-associated infections.
Solving environmental problems will require a broader view, one that requires professionals from different areas of health care to work together to meet the challenge.
Her instructive Epilogue compares American child care to the system in Sweden, France, Japan, Australia and Canada.
With the "LTC Choice" plan in place, most Americans will insure for the risk of long-term care to avoid putting their estates at risk.
In 1997, New York State passed legislation enabling the Institute and Cooperative Home Care to operate ICS as a managed long-term care demonstration program.
During the past twenty years, the disability community and rehabilitation professionals have worked to transform the negative image of persons with disabilities from passive patients requiring supervised medical care to informed consumers of medical and social services who make responsible choices (Watson, 1993).
First of all, it is offensive to me and the overwhelming majority of my colleagues to suggest that we would pad our bank accounts by obstructing or denying necessary medical care to our patients.
Although not affiliated with a group practice, Wilkerson had a managed care contract with an HMO (health maintenance organization) subsidiary of Capital Care to provide medical care for federal government employees.
Take Care Health's goal is to bring high-quality, affordable and convenient health care to patients on their terms," said Peter Miller, Take Care Health President and CEO.
Can physicians place their own financial motives second to the delivery of moral and ethical health care to their patients?