carcass

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carcass

(ˈkɑrkəs)
n. one’s body; a large or heavy body. Put your carcass on a chair, and let’s chew the fat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seventy five percent of carcasses were very old carcasses while 25 per cent were old.
Leachates derived from the decomposition of animal carcasses contain organic intermediates, volatile chemicals, and decomposing organisms [8].
Carcasses were subjectively evaluated using the visual method described by CEZAR & SOUSA (2007) to estimate their degree of conformation, fat cover, and perinephric-pelvic fat score.
Insects such as ants are able to opportunistically colonize vertebrate carcasses that show exudates and tissues in decomposition (Early & Goff, 1986; Campobasso, Marchetti, Introna, & Colonna, 2009).
It is accepted that mutton carcasses are fattier than beef carcasses.
MD Sinha, conservator of forest ( Gurgaon range) said: " Dumping of carcasses in the open cannot be justified by any means.
Herein we report scavenging behavior by a female bobcat and cub at domestic pig (Sus scrofa) carcasses during a carrion utilization study in central Oklahoma.
coyote (Canis latrans Say), bobcat (Lynx rufus Schreber), and otter (Lutra canadensis Schreber) carcasses from roadside locations within a 30 km radius of the study site.
The role of genotype on classification grades of beef carcasses produced under Mexican tropical conditions
A BUSINESS owner has been fined PS32,000 for using farm buildings to store and transfer animal carcasses.
This experiment was designed to determine whether Nicrophorus guttula beetles prefer mammalian or avian carcasses for their broods.
Compared to January 2013, the total weight of dressed carcasses of cattle slaughtered in February 2013 decreased by about 17%, of horses by about 13%, of poultry by about 9% and of pigs by about 5%.
CONCERN is mounting about the dangers posed by dumped horse carcasses following a spate of incidents across the Vale of Glamorgan.
Dr Allaby reached his conclusions after taking 45 samples from the wounds of the deer carcasses, testing them for DNA from the saliva of canids, such as dogs or foxes, or cat species which had killed the deer or scavenged from it.