camp

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boot camp

1. A camp where military recruits are rigorously trained in combat, physical fitness, military drills, etc. The military always sounded like a romantic career, but boot camp nearly killed me!
2. A training camp for juvenile offenders or troublesome adolescents modeled after military basic training, meant to instill socially acceptable values and behaviors through rigorous disciplinary, physical, and psychological exercises. Our son was out of control for several years, but after he came back from boot camp, it was like he was a whole new person.
3. Any training camp or course that teaches by means of an intensive and immersive environment. I hear that the computer programming boot camp is full-on, but that you'll come away from it with comprehensive skills in the field.
See also: boot, camp

camp follower

1. A civilian who follows a military unit from one location to the next, either because the person is closely related to a service member or to unofficially provide goods or services to members of the unit. Daniel spent his childhood as a camp follower. His father was in the army, so he and his mother had to move a lot.
2. A person who supports a group or cause without officially belonging to its organization. I always vote Republican, but I'm a camp follower—I'm registered as an Independent.
See also: camp, follower

break camp

to close down a campsite; to pack up and move on. Early this morning we broke camp and moved on northward. Okay, everyone. It's time to break camp. Take those tents down and fold them neatly.
See also: break, camp

camp it up

[for performers] to overact or behave in an affected manner. The cast began to camp it up in the second act, and the critics walked out. (Fixed order.) There is no need to camp it up. Play it the way it was written.
See also: camp, up

camp out

to live out of doors temporarily in a tent or camping vehicle, as on a vacation or special camping trip. I love to camp out in the winter.
See also: camp, out

*foot in both camps

Fig. an interest in or to support each of two opposing groups of people. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) The shop steward had been promised a promotion and so had a foot in both camps during the strike—workers and management. Mr. Smith has a foot in both camps in the parent-teacher dispute. He teaches math, but he has a son at the school.
See also: both, camp, foot

*in the boondocks

 and *in the boonies
in a rural area; far away from a city or population. (*Typically: be ~; camp ~; live ~; stay ~.) Perry lives out in the boonies with his parents.

pitch camp

to set up or arrange a campsite. We pitched camp near the stream. Two campers went ahead of us to pitch camp while it was still light.
See also: camp, pitch

break camp

to fold up and pack a tent and other equipment used to camp We broke camp yesterday and hiked to town, where we caught a bus back to the city.
See also: break, camp

camp out

1. to live in the open air for a time, often in a tent When I was in high school, during the summer we would camp out at the lake.
2. to live in a place temporarily without many possessions The floods forced people from the city to camp out with relatives or even in public parks.
See also: camp, out

a camp follower

someone who strongly supports a person or group although they are not a member of an official organization The campaign for real ale had gathered quite a number of camp followers.
See also: camp, follower

have/keep a foot in both camps

to be involved with two groups of people who often have very different aims and opinions He has moved from fringe to mainstream theatre, but he still keeps a foot in both camps.
See also: both, camp, foot, have

break camp

Take down a tent and pack up other gear; also, leave a place, move out. For example, The landlord has to return my rent deposit before I'll break camp. Originally camp denoted a military encampment, but by the mid-1500s the term had been transferred to temporary outdoor sites used by hunters and the like. By the 19th century, the current term was in use. Thus, "It is the hunter's rule to see that the fire is extinguished ... before breaking camp." (F.H. Guillemard, Cruise of Marchesa I, 1886).
See also: break, camp

camp follower

1. A civilian who follows or settles near a military camp, especially a prostitute who does so. For example, The recruits were told not to associate with camp followers. [Early 1800s]
2. A person who sympathizes with a cause or group but does not join it. For example, She's only a camp follower so we can't count on her for a contribution.
See also: camp, follower

camp it up

Make an extravagant, affected, or vulgar display, as in Amateur actors often camp it up, trying to be more dramatic. Originating in the 1950s as slang for flamboyant behavior stereotypically associated with gay men, this term began to be used more loosely by about 1970. Also see ham it up.
See also: camp, up

camp out

Sleep outdoors; also, stay somewhere for an unusually long time. For example, "We camped out in a field this night" (George Washington, Journal, March 18, 1748). In the early 1900s, the expression was extended to figurative uses, meaning simply "to stay somewhere for an unusually long time," as in She camped out at the stage door, hoping for an autograph.
See also: camp, out

foot in both camps, have a

Support or have good relations with two opposing sides. For example, He had a foot in both camps, making donations to candidates in both parties. In this expression camp alludes to encampments of enemy troops in a battle. [First half of 1900s]
See also: both, foot, have

camp out

v.
1. To sleep outdoors, usually in a tent: If the weather is nice, we should camp out on the mountain.
2. To reside at some place temporarily, especially under difficult conditions: I had to camp out in my cousin's living room until I found an apartment of my own.
See also: camp, out

camp

1. n. something cute and out of fashion; something of such an anachronistic style as to be intriguing. Nobody really knows what style camp really is, and very few even care.
2. and campy mod. overdone; out of fashion and intriguing. Most camp entertainment is pretentious and overdrawn.
3. mod. having to do with homosexual persons and matters. She is so camp, I could scream!

camp it up

1. tv. to overact. Can you make it a little more lively without camping it up?
2. tv. to overdo effeminacy; [for a homosexual male] to act too effeminate in public. John just loves to burst into the most sedate hotel in town and camp it up in the lobby.
See also: camp, up

break camp

To pack up equipment and leave a campsite.
See also: break, camp
References in classic literature ?
And so it was that as Tarzan, stripped to the loin cloth and armed after the primitive fashion he best loved, led his loyal Waziri toward the dead city of Opar, Werper, the renegade, haunted his trail through the long, hot days, and camped close behind him by night.
But Tarzan of the Apes was haunted by the picture of a slight, young girl being shoved and struck by brutal Negresses, and in imagination could see her now camped in this savage country a prisoner among degraded blacks.
By eleven he was at the foot of White Horse, and that night saw him camped beyond the Box Canon, the last bad river-stretch behind him, the string of lakes before him.
By all rights, Daylight should have camped below the last pitch of the pass at the dim end of day; but he kept on and over and down to Sheep Camp, while behind him raged a snow-storm that would have delayed him twenty-four hours.
Daylight won across Chilcoot that same day, dropping down five hundred feet in the darkness and the flurrying snow to Crater Lake, where he camped.
They were camped near the log store, where she, in her friendly way, made advances to a husky dog the size of a full-grown wolf, though not half so large as she.
7 years) who camped at a traditional, residential, boys' summer sports camp that offered two-week sessions.