call in sick

call in sick

To inform one's employer that one will be absent due to illness (real or feigned). The phrase originally referred to calling by phone, but can refer to any form of communication (such as email). That virus has totally decimated my staff—only two people are in the office today because the rest called in sick! If you really want to go to the beach tomorrow, just call in sick.
See also: call, sick

call in sick

to call one's place of work to say that one is ill and cannot come to work. (See also report in sick.) Four of our office staff called in sick today. I have to call in sick today.
See also: call, sick

call in sick

Telephone one's employer or school that one is ill and cannot come to work or attend. For example, Ben called in sick and told his boss he would miss the meeting. [Mid-1900s]
See also: call, sick
References in periodicals archive ?
If an employee's child is sick and no support person/group is available, the employee might call in sick rather than taking a vacation day.
Most people feel too guilty to call in sick,'' says Ann Marie Sabath, a Cincinnati-based business etiquette consultant and author of ``Business Etiquette in Brief.
Half of those surveyed said they believed their bosses preferred that they come to work when sick; 40 percent revealed feeling ``too guilty'' to call in sick.
They simply accept the fact that they will always have certain employees who consistently call in sick on Mondays or Fridays so they can have an extended weekend.
They should emphasize the fact that unscheduled absences cause safety hazards to the public and to the officers' colleagues, who must fill in when individuals call in sick.