the Greek calends

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Related to calends: Roman calendar
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the Greek calends

A time that is expected to never arrive or occur. (Used after a preposition, especially "at," "on," or "till.") A reference to the day of the new moon and the first day of the month in the ancient Roman calendar, which the Greeks did not observe. You lent that leech John more money? It'll be at the Greek calends when he pays you back.
See also: Greek
References in periodicals archive ?
Its Latin name is derived from calends, the first day of the Roman month, because it was thought to bloom at every new moon.
The Romans called their new year Calends and Julius Caesar named the first month January after the two-headed god Janus who looks backward in memory and forward in hope.
It makes such inequalities legitimate because it provides theoretically for their transitory nature while in practice postponing real change for the Greek calends.
GIVEN ON THE THIRD DAY BEFORE THE CALENDS OF MARCH AT CONSTANTINOPLE, IN THE CONSULATE OF THE TWO AUGUSTI, ARCADIUS FOR THE FOURTH TIME AND HONORIUS FOR THE THIRD TIME.
This December holiday was followed by the Calends of January, a New Year's celebration where lavish hospitality was again the rule.
Paul's Day (celebrating his conversion) closes the calends of the new year, and the weather that prevails on that day will prevail for the rest of the year (Coltro, 65).
Thus, Canon 1 from the late sixth-century Council of Auxerre establishes that '[n]on licet Kalendis Ianuarii vetolo aut cervolo facere vel streneas diabolicas observare' ('it is unlawful on the calends of January to dress up as a calf or a young stag, or to observe diabolical new-year rites').
Calends was the first day of each Roman month; among the Greeks, it represented a figurative, godly time, since the Greeks observed no calends.