calaboose


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calaboose

(ˈkæləbus)
n. jail. (From a Spanish word.) Are we going to tell what happened, or are we going to spend the night in the calaboose?
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Calaboose website: "In the shadows of the Great Smoky Mountains, there's an old stone building with bars on the windows that overlooks our small vineyard.
Calaboose produces about 400 cases per year from native American and hybrid grapes as well as local fruit; they retail from $10/bottle for dessert wines to $18 for Chambourcin and Seyval.
We were looking to showcase our tiny calaboose on oar varietal labels and have some fun with our fanciful (proprietary) labels.
Between 1876 and 1909, this calaboose held more than 3,000 prisoners.
Figuring that members might not see the humor in a threat to send legislators to the calaboose, they decided the bill should be sponsored by two representatives: one had the surname Love, the other Kindness.
Not too long ago I completed what I consider one of my best efforts: stories on brutality in the local calaboose that resulted in serious reforms.
The last alternative may prove to be the most challenging and will certainly make an exciting try for the folks back home--that is, if the local authorities allow postcards to be sent from the calaboose.
When she's released from her hospital bed, the local prosecutor says they've got a bed waiting for her in the calaboose.
Not-quite-spotted going from the El Paso jail: Creative convict and accused distributor of unlicensed pharmaceuticals--what we used to call a "dope dealer" in the old, politically insensitive era--Carlos Medina-Bailon, who quietly slipped outta the calaboose by stowing away in the garbage-collection system.