caboose


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caboose

(kəˈbus)
n. the buttocks. (From the name of the car at the end of a railroad train.) You just plunk your caboose over there on the settee and listen up to what I have to tell you.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lynch Memorial Scholarship, Triplett wrote, "Whether I was the caboose or the head [of the line], I was determined that I would win the election by taking my message to the people and letting them decide.
All these changes are summarized by one variable, the ratio of caboose miles to freight train miles, or, approximately, the fraction of freight train miles operated with cabooses.
Those of the public who wanted to go West could take such accommodation as the caboose or the cars loaded with ties or rails afforded.
This final tweak: Move that only (last sentence) to the caboose.
At this point the caboose becomes the engine, and the Man Train makes its opprobrious return trip, making eye contact a second time with those they unceremoniously squeezed past moments earlier.
I'm anxious to see Japan take the step that will put them on a track to grow their economy at a rate that makes them an engine of world growth rather than a middle car or caboose,'' O'Neill told reporters before a meeting in Ottawa on Friday and Saturday of the Group of Seven (G-7) finance ministers and central bankers.
ESSENTIALS: Thirty-three rooms plus four caboose cottages.
Denver-based Caboose Hobbies Manager Mark Graybill said, "We get some women in the store, not enough.
Little Red Caboose Garrett Mott, 5 League City, Texas
The horror of this accident brings out all the bitterness Anne feels about the cruelty of this environment and her isolation from civilization: her son, nearly dead, has to be taken through the Rockies in a railway caboose to get him to a hospital in Jasper, Alberta.
And as the caboose diminished in the distance I waved and said aloud, "Bye bye.
Set up in the highest site or in a caboose or lookout tower?
There are one thousand metaphors, a father's fortune in their eyes: hollow star, broken wheel, caboose, wild horse, wings over a blue pond.