by means of


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by means of (something)

Due to something. I only wake up in time for work by means of an alarm clock. I was able to get an A in my math class this semester by means of hard work.
See also: by, mean, of

by means of something

using something; with the use of something. I opened the bottle by means of a bottle opener. I was able to afford a car by means of a loan.
See also: by, mean, of

by means of

Through the use of, owing to, as in We plan to pay for medical school by means of a second mortgage, or He'll succeed by means of sheer persistence. [Early 1400s] Also see by dint of.
See also: by, mean, of

by means of

With the use of; owing to: They succeeded by means of patience and sacrifice.
See also: by, mean, of
References in periodicals archive ?
3a) I can argue from the first sentence to the conclusion that somebody intended the utterance of x to produce some effect in an audience by means of the recognition of this intention, or at least should have intended the utterance of x to produce some effect in an audience by means of the recognition of this intention.
Nonetheless, he proceeds to assert that arsenokoites had a more specific meaning in Greco-Roman culture than we can be aware of and that "it seems to have referred to some kind of economic exploitation by means of sex, perhaps but not necessarily homosexual sex.
In a double-blind manner, nurses in the Ambulatory Surgery Unit assessed each patient's degree of postoperative pain on each side 3 hours postoperatively by means of a 10-point visual analog scale.
The communicational as well as the informational models that follow (or precede) this general logic or form for constitutional communities can be seen in terms of Realpolitik during times of war or similar moments of crisis, when the national body is understood as "pulling together"--that is, reestablishing, or in reality redefining, its cultural, social, and geopolitical boundaries by means of common pronouncements and judgments.
As he says in his Introduction, "We can find meaning in the present, not instead of a reconstruction of the past, but by means of a reconstruction of the past.
50] Gardiner is attracted to the use of the solar analogy by Bucer, another expatriate reformer influential in England and specifically on Cranmer, since it also makes the point that the sun is substantially present" on earth by means of its sunbeams.