buy something

buy something

Believe something; accept as true or satisfactory. For example, You think he's a millionaire? I just won't buy that. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: buy
References in classic literature ?
I wanted to buy something from him to help him in such a worthy object.
I was driving past Yusupov's house just now," said Berg with a laugh, "when the steward, a man I know, ran out and asked me whether I wouldn't buy something.
Arthur silently resolved that he would make Bessy a present of money before the day was over, that she might buy something more to her mind; but she, not aware of the consolation in store for her, turned out of the open space, where she was visible from the marquee, and throwing down the odious bundle under a tree, began to cry--very much tittered at the while by the small boys.
Your woman has a gown, and her whole seven weeks wages are gone; ours has a gown, and two days' wages left, to buy something else with.
Brother Claude, give me at least one little parisis to buy something to eat.
I took heart to tell him that I had had nothing all night, and that if he would allow me to buy something to eat, I should be very much obliged to him.
Cassandra was driven finally, by her own unrest, to put on her clothes and wander out along the streets of Chelsea, on the pretence that she must buy something.
Pressed hard, he said that he would take five dollars, because he wanted to buy something for a girl.
SHOULD we get involved Some say yes Some say no What can we do What can we say Should we look the other way So let's walk on by Look at the sky Look at the rides Smell the flowers Buy something new today Should we look the other way Next week will be different Something else to worry about Let the children play Let the snails live Give to charity and say Should we look the other way High in the mountains Thinking of a holiday In some far off land I understand and pray Should we look the other way Tell me your secrets Tell me some lies How do you sleep As time goes by It's a beautiful day Should we look the other way.
If you buy something or sign up to something in your home, someone else's home or your place of work, this is called a doorstep sale.
The authors said that they told one group of people to head to Starbucks and buy something for themselves and told another group to pass their gift card along to someone else.
If you buy something without face-to-face contact, you will usually have a 'cooling off period' of seven working days.
If they are offering you a credit note, I'd be tempted to accept it and buy something else instead.
If you really want to buy something, consider a pumpkin or two late in the month that can do double duty at Thanksgiving.
It's tough when you're always forking out for gifts - but I think you should still buy something.