buy off


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

buy off

To pay someone to coerce them into doing something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "off." Don't worry, the doorman won't say anything—I bought him off. Her campaign for mayor will be ruined if the public learns how many people she's bought off over the years.
See also: buy, off

buy someone off

to bribe someone to ignore what one is doing wrong. Do you think you can buy her off? The mobster tried to buy off the jury.
See also: buy, off

buy off

Pay to get rid of a claim or opposition, or to avoid prosecution, as in He was caught trying to buy off the opposing candidate. [First half of 1600s]
See also: buy, off

buy off

v.
To bribe someone in order to ensure cooperation: I didn't get a speeding ticket because I bought off the police officer. The mobster avoided jail by buying the judge off.
See also: buy, off
References in periodicals archive ?
Money won't cure it either - you can't buy off superbugs.
And they dismissed the offer of a pounds 49million lifeline for the Birmingham business as a possible attempt to buy off a future official inquiry.
Aslef president Dave Tyson denied an attempt to buy off Mr Brady - who is fighting his dismissal.
A Greek court convicted Thomas Rogers, 25, of Alloway, Ayr, of carrying out a sex attack on the woman, but allowed him to buy off the rest of his sentence.
So Leicester will have to buy off Collymore, whose bust-up with young team-mate Trevor Benjamin during a reserve game last week was the final straw for fed-up Taylor.
POP stars last night led the fight against a pounds 143million package designed to buy off a Labour rebellion on student charges.
Education Secretary David Blunkett failed to buy off the rebellion with a pounds 143million package to help mature students, the disabled and people from poor families.