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drive the porcelain bus

To vomit profusely into the toilet, usually as the result of drinking excessive amounts of alcohol. John was driving the porcelain bus for the rest of the night after his seventh tequila shot.
See also: bus, drive, porcelain

park the bus

In football (soccer), to employ all (or nearly all) of a team's active players in defending its own side of the pitch. Protecting a narrow one-point lead, it looks like the home team has parked the bus for the remaining minutes of the match.
See also: bus, park

throw (someone) under the bus

1. To exploit someone's trust for one's own purpose, gain, or agenda; to harm someone through deceit or treachery. Senator Davis was supposed to be working with me to bridge the gap between Democrats and Republicans on the issue of gun control, but, instead, she threw me under the bus to get a boost in the polls with her constituency. The investment company threw its clients under the bus when it chose to redirect their hard earned money into various Ponzi schemes that benefited only a few board members at the top.
2. To avoid blame, trouble, or criticism by allowing someone else to take responsibility. Tommy was caught with the marijuana in his backpack, but he threw me under the bus and said it belonged to me. Our manager never hesitates to throw an underling under the bus when something goes wrong in the office.
See also: bus, throw

drive the big bus

and drive the porcelain bus and ride the porcelain bus
tv. to vomit into the toilet. Harry’s in the john driving the big bus. I guess that “drive the porcelain bus” refers to holding onto the toilet seat while you vomit.
See also: big, bus, drive

drive the porcelain bus

verb
See also: bus, drive, porcelain

ride the porcelain bus

verb
See also: bus, porcelain, ride
References in periodicals archive ?
The conclusion that busing affects achievement is contradicted by the high performance of the African American students at Lincolnwood who come from essentially the same neighborhood and are also bused to school," said Luecke.
The school board will talk this fall about changing or removing the 60 percent guideline as one way to reduce the busing, and, possibly in turn, help the achievement picture.
He hopes to glean knowledge about that and other subjects from the district's research, and then "have reasonable discussions about some adjustments that can be made" to the busing picture, he said.
It's likely that no one in Evanston will feel satisfied until they see improved test scores--and for some, that means that busing to achieve integration may have to go.