bury the hatchet


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bury the hatchet

Fig. to make peace. Let's stop arguing and bury the hatchet. Tom and I buried the hatchet and we are good friends now.
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bury the hatchet

to agree that you will forget about arguments and disagreements with someone The two teammates hope to bury the hatchet long enough to win the championship.
Etymology: based on the custom of literally burying a hatchet (cutting tool with a small handle) as a symbol of peace between Native American tribes (groups of people)
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

to forget about arguments and disagreements with someone and to become friends with them again It had been over a year since the incident and I thought it was time we buried the hatchet.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

Make peace; settle one's differences. For example, Toward the end of the year, the roommates finally decided to bury the hatchet. Although some believe this term comes from a Native American custom for declaring peace between warring tribes, others say it comes from hang up one's hatchet, a term dating from the early 1300s (well before Columbus landed in the New World). The word bury replaced hang up in the 1700s.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

1. tv. to make peace. (From an alleged American Indian practice.) I’m sorry. Let’s stop arguing and bury the hatchet.
2. tv. to leave surgical instruments in the patient. (Medical.) The idea that a doctor would bury the hatchet is a very old joke.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

To make peace, to settle differences. The phrase comes from the practice among native American and Canadian tribes literally to bury a war axe at the end of hostilities. An 1680 report describes European colonists in what became New England: “Meeting wth ye Sachem [the tribal leaders] the[y] came to an agreemt and buried two Axes in ye Ground; which ceremony to them is more significant & binding than all Articles of Peace . . .”
See also: bury, hatchet
References in periodicals archive ?
ANDY GRIFFIN once traded blows with Laurent Robert on the training ground but yesterday promised to bury the hatchet when the Frenchman joined him at Portsmouth.
I don't think there are any plans for lunch any time soon,'' he said, obviously concerned about where Haynes plans to bury the hatchet.
The jockey tried to scalp the birthday boy with a giant bone but Ronnie was happy to bury the hatchet.
ENGLAND star Ben Cohen has been urged by the new management of Northampton to bury the hatchet with the club which planned to axe him.
The writer credits Phoenix Pictures chieftain Mike Medavoy for getting him and Stone to bury the hatchet.
ANGRY Manchester United fans yesterday demanded racing tycoon John Magnier bury the hatchet with Alex Ferguson - or face their fury.
Jeff Moorad, Guerrero's agent, said the club paying Guerrero ``contributed to it making sense to go ahead and bury the hatchet on this thing and start serving the suspension (Monday).
The former Foreign Secretary has decided to bury the hatchet with the Chancellor and his supporters are seeking a meeting.
WILL Noel Gallagher and baby bro Liam ever bury the hatchet once and for all?
Business expert Professor Stuart Gulliver says Scotland's capital and its largest city must bury the hatchet to help business.
While World War III broke out among their formerly peaceful pals at Brian's birthday the duo chose to bury the hatchet.