bury the hatchet

(redirected from buries the hatchet)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

bury the hatchet

1. To make peace with someone. Can you please bury the hatchet and make up with your sister already? I can't take the constant fighting.
2. slang To accidentally leave medical instruments inside a patient after surgery. The surgeons have a strict protocal to avoid burying the hatchet, so to speak.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

Fig. to make peace. Let's stop arguing and bury the hatchet. Tom and I buried the hatchet and we are good friends now.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

to agree that you will forget about arguments and disagreements with someone The two teammates hope to bury the hatchet long enough to win the championship.
Etymology: based on the custom of literally burying a hatchet (cutting tool with a small handle) as a symbol of peace between Native American tribes (groups of people)
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

to forget about arguments and disagreements with someone and to become friends with them again It had been over a year since the incident and I thought it was time we buried the hatchet.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

Make peace; settle one's differences. For example, Toward the end of the year, the roommates finally decided to bury the hatchet. Although some believe this term comes from a Native American custom for declaring peace between warring tribes, others say it comes from hang up one's hatchet, a term dating from the early 1300s (well before Columbus landed in the New World). The word bury replaced hang up in the 1700s.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

1. tv. to make peace. (From an alleged American Indian practice.) I’m sorry. Let’s stop arguing and bury the hatchet.
2. tv. to leave surgical instruments in the patient. (Medical.) The idea that a doctor would bury the hatchet is a very old joke.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

To make peace, to settle differences. The phrase comes from the practice among native American and Canadian tribes literally to bury a war axe at the end of hostilities. An 1680 report describes European colonists in what became New England: “Meeting wth ye Sachem [the tribal leaders] the[y] came to an agreemt and buried two Axes in ye Ground; which ceremony to them is more significant & binding than all Articles of Peace . . .”
See also: bury, hatchet