burden

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bear the burden (of something)

To endure something distressing, painful, stressful, or emotionally or physically taxing, especially for the sake of others. Our mother bore the burden of this farm for 53 years until the day she died. My partner quit his job to stay home with the baby, so I have to bear the burden of earning enough to pay the mortgage.
See also: bear, burden

burden of proof

The requirement and obligation of providing sound, reasonable evidence supporting a charge or allegation. Originating and used primarily in law, it can be applied more broadly to any situation in which a contentious dispute arises. In court, the burden of proof always rests on the plaintiffs and the prosecutors. The burden of proof is on you to show that the computer was broken before you bought it.
See also: burden, of, proof

beast of burden

A domesticated animal used by humans to carry or pull heavy loads. Camels have been used by people as beasts of burden for thousands of years because of their size, strength, and ability to travel long distances with minimal need for food and water.
See also: beast, burden, of

burden someone or something with someone or something

to bother or weigh down someone or something with someone or something. Please don't burden us with the bad news at this time. I don't want to burden the school with a troublesome child.
See also: burden

burden someone with something

to give unpleasant information to someone; to give someone some bad news. I hate to burden you with this, but your cat ran away. I wish I had not been burdened with all the facts.
See also: burden

a beast of burden

  (literary)
a large animal, such as a donkey (= an animal like a small horse with long ears), which is used for pulling vehicles or carrying heavy loads Huskies are traditionally used in the Arctic as beasts of burden.
See also: beast, burden, of

burden of proof

Obligation of proving a disputed charge or allegation. For example, Are you sure you mailed the tax return on time? The burden of proof's on you. A legal term dating from the late 1500s, it has also been used more loosely in recent times.
See also: burden, of, proof
References in periodicals archive ?
Supporters argued that without the federal law, zoning regulations that impose substantial burdens on houses of worship would too often be upheld and that prisoners, detainees and institutionalized mental health patients faced major burdens in practicing their religious beliefs.
The NAM study illustrates that American businesses could compete successfully in the international marketplace--if they were relieved of the onerous burdens placed on them by Washington.
Graham attributed the progress to his office's aggressive enforcement of the PRA, as well as implementation of new technologies to reduce paperwork burdens.
Infants and children are thought to carry greater burdens of lead and many other pollutants than most adults because youngsters have different metabolic rates, have more contact with contaminated floors and ground, and are more likely to transfer harmful chemicals into their mouths.
Chemical body burdens are easily monitored using breast milk samples collected from first-time mothers (primiparae) with infants 2-8 weeks of age.
Research findings on the relation between objective and subjective burdens have been contradictory.
banking organizations and reducing associated regulatory burdens.
Unemployment taxes and disability insurance may be officially paid by your employer, but you actually bear any resulting burdens your employer can anticipate from hiring you.
2292) that would require the General Accounting Office to conduct a study of the differences between civil and criminal burdens of proof in IRS and nonIRS contexts and to report to Congress what impact changing the burdens would have on tax administration and taxpayer rights.
A recent decision demonstrated the significant and multi-faceted burdens that a would-be successor to a rent regulated tenancy must meet.
With all the hand-wringing in Washington over oppressive tax burdens, you'd think the payroll tax would be at the top of the list.
In 1993, the Supreme Court clarified the third prong of the analysis regarding burdens of proof in Title VII matters.
Most supplications in the early part of the war focused on the inequity of burdens rather than on the amount of damage, but supplicants lost no opportunity to describe themselves as "poor, overburdened villages" from which one could scarce expect to raise another heller of taxes or supplies.
Since incomes have generally been rising, falling debt burdens are likely the result of deleveraging and falling interest rates.